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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19818

Holbein, M; Béchir, M; Ludwig, S; Sommerfeld, J; Cottini, S R; Keel, M; Stocker, R; Stover, J F (2009). Differential influence of arterial blood glucose on cerebral metabolism following severe traumatic brain injury. Critical Care, 13(1):R13.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Maintaining arterial blood glucose within tight limits is beneficial in critically ill patients. Upper and lower limits of detrimental blood glucose levels must be determined. METHODS: In 69 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), cerebral metabolism was monitored by assessing changes in arterial and jugular venous blood at normocarbia (partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (paCO2) 4.4 to 5.6 kPa), normoxia (partial arterial pressure of oxygen (paO2) 9 to 20 kPa), stable haematocrit (27 to 36%), brain temperature 35 to 38 degrees C, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) 70 to 90 mmHg. This resulted in a total of 43,896 values for glucose uptake, lactate release, oxygen extraction ratio (OER), carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate (HCO3) production, jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), oxygen-glucose index (OGI), lactate-glucose index (LGI) and lactate-oxygen index (LOI). Arterial blood glucose concentration-dependent influence was determined retrospectively by assessing changes in these parameters within pre-defined blood glucose clusters, ranging from less than 4 to more than 9 mmol/l. RESULTS: Arterial blood glucose significantly influenced signs of cerebral metabolism reflected by increased cerebral glucose uptake, decreased cerebral lactate production, reduced oxygen consumption, negative LGI and decreased cerebral CO2/HCO3 production at arterial blood glucose levels above 6 to 7 mmol/l compared with lower arterial blood glucose concentrations. At blood glucose levels more than 8 mmol/l signs of increased anaerobic glycolysis (OGI less than 6) supervened. CONCLUSIONS: Maintaining arterial blood glucose levels between 6 and 8 mmol/l appears superior compared with lower and higher blood glucose concentrations in terms of stabilised cerebral metabolism. It appears that arterial blood glucose values below 6 and above 8 mmol/l should be avoided. Prospective analysis is required to determine the optimal arterial blood glucose target in patients suffering from severe TBI.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:6 February 2009
Deposited On:16 Sep 2009 15:14
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 21:23
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1364-8535
Publisher DOI:10.1186/cc7711
PubMed ID:19196488
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 18
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Scopus®. Citation Count: 23

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