Quick Search:

uzh logo
Browse by:
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Zurich Open Repository and Archive 

Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-19833

Edwards, P; Arango, M; Balica, L; Cottingham, R; El-Sayed, H; Farrell, B; Fernandes, J; Gogichaisvili, T; Golden, N; Hartzenberg, B; Husain, M; Ulloa, M I; Jerbi, Z; Khamis, H; Komolafe, E; Laloë, V; Lomas, G; Ludwig, S; Mazairac, G; Muñoz Sanchéz, M; Nasi, L; Olldashi, F; Plunkett, P; Roberts, I; Sandercock, P; Shakur, H; Soler, C; Stocker, R; Svoboda, P; Trenkler, S; Venkataramana, N K; Wasserberg, J; Yates, D; Yutthakasemsunt, S (2005). Final results of MRC CRASH, a randomised placebo-controlled trial of intravenous corticosteroid in adults with head injury-outcomes at 6 months. Lancet, 365(9475):1957-1959.

[img]PDF - Registered users only
1084Kb

Abstract

MRC CRASH is a randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN74459797) of the effect of corticosteroids on death and disability after head injury. We randomly allocated 10,008 adults with head injury and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or less, within 8 h of injury, to a 48-h infusion of corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) or placebo. Data at 6 months were obtained for 9673 (96.7%) patients. The risk of death was higher in the corticosteroid group than in the placebo group (1248 [25.7%] vs 1075 [22.3%] deaths; relative risk 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.24; p=0.0001), as was the risk of death or severe disability (1828 [38.1%] vs 1728 [36.3%] dead or severely disabled; 1.05, 0.99-1.10; p=0.079). There was no evidence that the effect of corticosteroids differed by injury severity or time since injury. These results lend support to our earlier conclusion that corticosteroids should not be used routinely in the treatment of head injury.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Date:2005
Deposited On:16 Sep 2009 13:35
Last Modified:23 Nov 2012 15:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0140-6736
Publisher DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)66552-X
PubMed ID:15936423
Citations:Google Scholar™

Users (please log in): suggest update or correction for this item

Repository Staff Only: item control page