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Glatzel, M; Gottwein, J; Aguzzi, A (2002). Prionen als Motor der transmissiblen spongiformen Enzephalopathien. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 144(12):633-638.

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Abstract

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are degenerative disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) occurring in a variety of species. The causative agent is thought to be composed of an abnormal form of the host encoded prion protein (PrPC), termed PrPSc. The conformational change of PrPC into PrPSc can occur spontaneously, however, it can also be induced by PrPSc. Prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), scrapie and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Disease (vCJD) are most likely caused by peripheral uptake of prions. The process by which prions proceed to the CNS following peripheral uptake is referred to as neuroinvasion. Infection with prions is thought to occur in two phases: After ingestion prions first replicate in lymphatic tissue and then gain access to the CNS via peripheral nerves. Studies looking at the biochemical and clinical characteristics of BSE and vCJD demonstrated that BSE is most likely responsible for vCJD in humans.

Other titles:The role of prions in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2002
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:27
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 00:03
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0036-7281
Publisher DOI:10.1024/0036-7281.144.12.633
PubMed ID:12585203
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 2
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