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Lymph nodal prion replication and neuroinvasion in mice devoid of follicular dendritic cells.


Prinz, M; Montrasio, F; Klein, M A; Schwarz, P; Priller, J P; Odermatt, B; Pfeffer, K; Aguzzi, A (2002). Lymph nodal prion replication and neuroinvasion in mice devoid of follicular dendritic cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 99(2):919-924.

Abstract

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and scrapie are typically initiated by extracerebral exposure to prions, and exhibit early prion accumulation in germinal centers. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), whose development and maintenance in germinal centers depends on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin (LT) signaling, are thought to be indispensable for extraneural prion pathogenesis. Here, we administered prions intraperitoneally to mice deficient for TNF and LT signaling components. LT alpha(-/-), LT beta(-/-), LT betaR(-/-), and LT alpha(-/-) x TNFalpha(-/-) mice resisted infection and contained no infectivity in spleens and lymph nodes (when present). However, TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and some TNFalpha(-/-) mice developed scrapie similarly to wild-type mice. High prion titers were detected in lymph nodes, but not spleens, of TNFR1(-/-) and TNF alpha(-/-) mice despite absence of FDCs and germinal centers. Transfer of TNFR1(-/-) fetal liver cells into lethally irradiated Prnp(0/0) mice restored infectivity mainly in lymph nodes. Prion protein (PrP) colocalized with a minority of macrophages in tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 1(-/-) lymph nodes. Therefore, prion pathogenesis can be restricted to lymphoreticular subcompartments, and mature follicular dendritic cells are dispensable for this process. Macrophage subsets are plausible candidates for lymphoreticular prion pathogenesis and neuroinvasion in the absence of FDCs, and may represent a novel target for postexposure prophylaxis.

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and scrapie are typically initiated by extracerebral exposure to prions, and exhibit early prion accumulation in germinal centers. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), whose development and maintenance in germinal centers depends on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin (LT) signaling, are thought to be indispensable for extraneural prion pathogenesis. Here, we administered prions intraperitoneally to mice deficient for TNF and LT signaling components. LT alpha(-/-), LT beta(-/-), LT betaR(-/-), and LT alpha(-/-) x TNFalpha(-/-) mice resisted infection and contained no infectivity in spleens and lymph nodes (when present). However, TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and some TNFalpha(-/-) mice developed scrapie similarly to wild-type mice. High prion titers were detected in lymph nodes, but not spleens, of TNFR1(-/-) and TNF alpha(-/-) mice despite absence of FDCs and germinal centers. Transfer of TNFR1(-/-) fetal liver cells into lethally irradiated Prnp(0/0) mice restored infectivity mainly in lymph nodes. Prion protein (PrP) colocalized with a minority of macrophages in tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 1(-/-) lymph nodes. Therefore, prion pathogenesis can be restricted to lymphoreticular subcompartments, and mature follicular dendritic cells are dispensable for this process. Macrophage subsets are plausible candidates for lymphoreticular prion pathogenesis and neuroinvasion in the absence of FDCs, and may represent a novel target for postexposure prophylaxis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:22 January 2002
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Publisher DOI:10.1073/pnas.022626399
PubMed ID:11792852
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-1993

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