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Use of brain grafts to study the pathogenesis of prion diseases.


Aguzzi, A; Klein, M A; Musahl, C; Raeber, A J; Blättler, T; Hegyi, I; Frigg, R; Brandner, S (1998). Use of brain grafts to study the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Essays in Biochemistry, 33:133-147.

Abstract

For the study of prion neurotoxicity, we used neural-grafting techniques: mice devoid of the normal host prion protein (Prnp% mice) received a neural graft and were intracerebrally infected with mouse prions. The growth and differentiation properties of neural grafts were defined. Growth of embryonic neuroectodermal tissue was optimal at gestational days 12.5-13.5. The blood-brain barrier is reconstituted after 7 weeks in most animals. Scrapie-infected PrPC-expressing grafts develop a severe spongiform encephalopathy and contain proteinase-resistant protein and infectivity. Infected grafts deliver high amounts of prions to the host brain without eliciting disease. Infected grafts show a progressive disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Following intraocular prion inoculation of a transplanted Prnp% mouse, prions do not reach the intracerebral graft, indicating that PrP expression is required for propagation along the optic tract.

For the study of prion neurotoxicity, we used neural-grafting techniques: mice devoid of the normal host prion protein (Prnp% mice) received a neural graft and were intracerebrally infected with mouse prions. The growth and differentiation properties of neural grafts were defined. Growth of embryonic neuroectodermal tissue was optimal at gestational days 12.5-13.5. The blood-brain barrier is reconstituted after 7 weeks in most animals. Scrapie-infected PrPC-expressing grafts develop a severe spongiform encephalopathy and contain proteinase-resistant protein and infectivity. Infected grafts deliver high amounts of prions to the host brain without eliciting disease. Infected grafts show a progressive disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Following intraocular prion inoculation of a transplanted Prnp% mouse, prions do not reach the intracerebral graft, indicating that PrP expression is required for propagation along the optic tract.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Portland Press
ISSN:0071-1365
Publisher DOI:10.1042/bse0330133
Related URLs:http://essays.biochemistry.org/bsessays/033/bse0330133.htm
PubMed ID:10488447

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