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Magnet displacement: A rare complication following cochlear implantation


Wild, C; Allum, J; Probst, R; Abels, D; Fischer, C; Bodmer, D (2010). Magnet displacement: A rare complication following cochlear implantation. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 267(1):57-59.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe cases which reported complication after cochlear implantation in children: displacement of magnet from the receiver pocket, possibly aided by the use of magnetic toys. We observed magnet displacement in two female children from the same family and in one male child. Age at implantation was 23, 51, and 24 months, respectively. Magnet displacement occurred at 37, 16, and 32 months, respectively after the initial surgery. The magnets were replaced under general anaesthesia and we did not observe recurrent magnet dislodgement. Measurements indicated that forces required to remove the magnet from its pocket were not greater than those exerted by magnetic toys or the magnet used in the external sender coil. Although magnet displacement is not common after cochlear implantation, it is a major complication in children where subsequent general anaesthesia and surgery are necessary to replace the magnet. Therefore, we propose that pockets for removable magnets of cochlear implants used in children should be redesigned to increase forces to remove the magnet or that removable magnets not be used at all.

The purpose of this paper is to describe cases which reported complication after cochlear implantation in children: displacement of magnet from the receiver pocket, possibly aided by the use of magnetic toys. We observed magnet displacement in two female children from the same family and in one male child. Age at implantation was 23, 51, and 24 months, respectively. Magnet displacement occurred at 37, 16, and 32 months, respectively after the initial surgery. The magnets were replaced under general anaesthesia and we did not observe recurrent magnet dislodgement. Measurements indicated that forces required to remove the magnet from its pocket were not greater than those exerted by magnetic toys or the magnet used in the external sender coil. Although magnet displacement is not common after cochlear implantation, it is a major complication in children where subsequent general anaesthesia and surgery are necessary to replace the magnet. Therefore, we propose that pockets for removable magnets of cochlear implants used in children should be redesigned to increase forces to remove the magnet or that removable magnets not be used at all.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2010
Deposited On:11 Aug 2009 09:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:19
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-4477
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00405-009-1017-5
PubMed ID:19562363
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20111

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