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Glycinergic projection neurons of the cerebellum


Bagnall, M W; Zingg, B; Sakatos, A; Moghadam, S H; Zeilhofer, H U; Lac, S (2009). Glycinergic projection neurons of the cerebellum. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(32):10104-10110.

Abstract

The cerebellum funnels its entire output through a small number of presumed glutamatergic premotor projection neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei and GABAergic neurons that feed back to the inferior olive. Here we use transgenic mice selectively expressing green fluorescent protein in glycinergic neurons to demonstrate that many premotor output neurons in the medial cerebellar (fastigial) nuclei are in fact glycinergic, not glutamatergic as previously thought. These neurons exhibit similar firing properties as neighboring glutamatergic neurons and receive direct input from both Purkinje cells and excitatory fibers. Glycinergic fastigial neurons make functional projections to vestibular and reticular neurons in the ipsilateral brainstem, whereas their glutamatergic counterparts project contralaterally. Together, these data suggest that the cerebellum can influence motor outputs via two distinct and complementary pathways.

The cerebellum funnels its entire output through a small number of presumed glutamatergic premotor projection neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei and GABAergic neurons that feed back to the inferior olive. Here we use transgenic mice selectively expressing green fluorescent protein in glycinergic neurons to demonstrate that many premotor output neurons in the medial cerebellar (fastigial) nuclei are in fact glycinergic, not glutamatergic as previously thought. These neurons exhibit similar firing properties as neighboring glutamatergic neurons and receive direct input from both Purkinje cells and excitatory fibers. Glycinergic fastigial neurons make functional projections to vestibular and reticular neurons in the ipsilateral brainstem, whereas their glutamatergic counterparts project contralaterally. Together, these data suggest that the cerebellum can influence motor outputs via two distinct and complementary pathways.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:12 August 2009
Deposited On:18 Aug 2009 07:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:19
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
Additional Information:Holder of copyright: The Society for Neuroscience
Publisher DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2087-09.2009
PubMed ID:19675244
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20226

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