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Effects of plant species richness on stand structure and productivity


Wacker, L; Baudois, O; Eichenberger-Glinz, S; Schmid, B (2009). Effects of plant species richness on stand structure and productivity. Journal of Plant Ecology, 2(2):95-106.

Abstract

Aims
Aboveground biomass production commonly increases with species richness in plant biodiversity experiments. Little is known about the direct mechanisms that cause this result. We tested if by occupying different heights and depths above and below ground, and by optimizing the vertical distribution of leaf nitrogen, species in mixtures
can contribute to increased resource uptake and, thus, increased productivity of the community in comparison with monocultures.
Methods
We grew 24 grassland plant species, grouped into four nonoverlapping species pools, in monoculture and 3- and 6-species mixture in spatially heterogeneous and uniform soil nutrient conditions. Layered harvests of above- and belowground biomass, as well as leaf nitrogen and light measurements, were taken to assess vertical canopy and root space structure.
Important Findings
The distribution of leaf mass was shifted toward greater heights and light absorption was correspondingly enhanced in mixtures. However, only some mixtures had leaf nitrogen concentration profiles predicted to optimize whole-community carbon gain, whereas in other mixtures species seemed to behave more 'selfish'. Nevertheless, even in these communities, biomass production increased with
species richness. The distribution of root biomass below ground did not change from monocultures to three- and six-species mixtures and there was also no indication that mixtures were better than monocultures at extracting heterogeneously as compared to homogeneously distributed soil resources. We conclude that positive biodiversity effect on aboveground biomass production cannot easily
be explained by a single or few common mechanisms of differential space use. Rather, it seems that mechanisms vary with the particular set of species combined in a community.

Aims
Aboveground biomass production commonly increases with species richness in plant biodiversity experiments. Little is known about the direct mechanisms that cause this result. We tested if by occupying different heights and depths above and below ground, and by optimizing the vertical distribution of leaf nitrogen, species in mixtures
can contribute to increased resource uptake and, thus, increased productivity of the community in comparison with monocultures.
Methods
We grew 24 grassland plant species, grouped into four nonoverlapping species pools, in monoculture and 3- and 6-species mixture in spatially heterogeneous and uniform soil nutrient conditions. Layered harvests of above- and belowground biomass, as well as leaf nitrogen and light measurements, were taken to assess vertical canopy and root space structure.
Important Findings
The distribution of leaf mass was shifted toward greater heights and light absorption was correspondingly enhanced in mixtures. However, only some mixtures had leaf nitrogen concentration profiles predicted to optimize whole-community carbon gain, whereas in other mixtures species seemed to behave more 'selfish'. Nevertheless, even in these communities, biomass production increased with
species richness. The distribution of root biomass below ground did not change from monocultures to three- and six-species mixtures and there was also no indication that mixtures were better than monocultures at extracting heterogeneously as compared to homogeneously distributed soil resources. We conclude that positive biodiversity effect on aboveground biomass production cannot easily
be explained by a single or few common mechanisms of differential space use. Rather, it seems that mechanisms vary with the particular set of species combined in a community.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:biodiversity effects, heterogeneous nutrient distribution, leaf nitrogen allocation, root biomass distribution, spatial niche separation
Language:English
Date:15 June 2009
Deposited On:07 Oct 2009 10:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:19
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1752-9921
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Plant Ecology. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Effects of plant species richness on stand structure and productivity is available online at: http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2/2/95
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/jpe/rtp010
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20287

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