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Human c-Myc isoforms differentially regulate cell growth and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster.


Benassayag, C; Montero, L; Colombié, N; Gallant, P; Cribbs, D; Morello, D (2005). Human c-Myc isoforms differentially regulate cell growth and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Molecular and Cellular Biology, 25(22):9897-9909.

Abstract

The human c-myc proto-oncogene, implicated in the control of many cellular processes including cell growth and apoptosis, encodes three isoforms which differ in their N-terminal region. The functions of these isoforms have never been addressed in vivo. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster to examine their functions in a fully integrated system. First, we established that the human c-Myc protein can rescue lethal mutations of the Drosophila myc ortholog, dmyc, demonstrating the biological relevance of this model. Then, we characterized a new lethal dmyc insertion allele, which permits expression of human c-Myc in place of dMyc and used it to compare physiological activities of these isoforms in whole-organism rescue, transcription, cell growth, and apoptosis. These isoforms differ both quantitatively and qualitatively. Most remarkably, while the small c-MycS form truncated for much of its N-terminal trans-activation domain efficiently rescued viability and cell growth, it did not induce detectable programmed cell death. Our data indicate that the main functional difference between c-Myc isoforms resides in their apoptotic properties and that the N-terminal region, containing the conserved MbI motif, is decisive in governing the choice between growth and death.

The human c-myc proto-oncogene, implicated in the control of many cellular processes including cell growth and apoptosis, encodes three isoforms which differ in their N-terminal region. The functions of these isoforms have never been addressed in vivo. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster to examine their functions in a fully integrated system. First, we established that the human c-Myc protein can rescue lethal mutations of the Drosophila myc ortholog, dmyc, demonstrating the biological relevance of this model. Then, we characterized a new lethal dmyc insertion allele, which permits expression of human c-Myc in place of dMyc and used it to compare physiological activities of these isoforms in whole-organism rescue, transcription, cell growth, and apoptosis. These isoforms differ both quantitatively and qualitatively. Most remarkably, while the small c-MycS form truncated for much of its N-terminal trans-activation domain efficiently rescued viability and cell growth, it did not induce detectable programmed cell death. Our data indicate that the main functional difference between c-Myc isoforms resides in their apoptotic properties and that the N-terminal region, containing the conserved MbI motif, is decisive in governing the choice between growth and death.

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40 citations in Web of Science®
41 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 November 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:13
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
ISSN:0270-7306
Publisher DOI:10.1128/MCB.25.22.9897-9909.2005
PubMed ID:16260605
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-203

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