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Suffering and posttraumatic growth in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): a qualitative/quantitative case study


Wittmann, L; Sensky, T; Meder, L; Michel, B; Stoll, T; Büchi, S (2009). Suffering and posttraumatic growth in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): a qualitative/quantitative case study. Psychosomatics, 50(4):362-374.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In spite of the evident importance of suffering, the medical and psychological literature, with some exceptions, contains few contributions toward an understanding of its phenomenology, etiology, and alleviation.OBJECTIVE: To enhance understanding of suffering in chronic physical disease, the authors applied qualitative content analysis to semistructured interviews with 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.METHOD: This study was intended to be exploratory, adopting a predominantly qualitative approach, supplemented with quantitative data. Case reports, complemented by psychometric and objective illness-related data, were used to elucidate a model of suffering and to explain its etiology and its interaction with personal growth.RESULTS: Findings were consistent with the concept of suffering as a psychological process triggered and sustained by an appraised threat to the "Self" or "Personhood."CONCLUSION: Results indicate that various types of suffering have to be differentiated. Recognizing personal growth in response to the illness-experience may reduce suffering.

BACKGROUND: In spite of the evident importance of suffering, the medical and psychological literature, with some exceptions, contains few contributions toward an understanding of its phenomenology, etiology, and alleviation.OBJECTIVE: To enhance understanding of suffering in chronic physical disease, the authors applied qualitative content analysis to semistructured interviews with 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.METHOD: This study was intended to be exploratory, adopting a predominantly qualitative approach, supplemented with quantitative data. Case reports, complemented by psychometric and objective illness-related data, were used to elucidate a model of suffering and to explain its etiology and its interaction with personal growth.RESULTS: Findings were consistent with the concept of suffering as a psychological process triggered and sustained by an appraised threat to the "Self" or "Personhood."CONCLUSION: Results indicate that various types of suffering have to be differentiated. Recognizing personal growth in response to the illness-experience may reduce suffering.

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13 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:August 2009
Deposited On:26 Aug 2009 08:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:20
Publisher:American Psychiatric Press Inc
ISSN:0033-3182
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.50.4.362
PubMed ID:19687177
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20349

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