UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Extensive extranodal metastases of basal-like breast cancer with predominant myoepithelial spindle cell differentiation


Trepp, R; Padberg, B; Varga, Z; Cathomas, R; Inauen, R; Reinhart, W H (2009). Extensive extranodal metastases of basal-like breast cancer with predominant myoepithelial spindle cell differentiation. Pathology - Research and Practice:1-4.

Abstract

A differentiation towards myoepithelial cells has been demonstrated in several types of lesions in the breast. These include multifocal myoepitheliomatosis, the rare mixed tumor or pleomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma and myoepithelial carcinoma (malignant myoepithelioma). Myoepithelial carcinoma is the only lesion purely composed of myoepithelial cells. All these tumors are benign and/or of low-grade malignancy, with the exception of malignant myoepithelioma. In contrast to the statement of the current World Health Organization (WHO), recent studies have reported that regional and distant metastases may occur in about 50% of pure myoepithelial carcinomas. The presented case of a breast carcinoma with dominant myoepithelial/spindle cell differentiation in a 58-year-old woman is an excellent example to document the highly aggressive biological behavior of this tumor phenotype. Despite an extensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the tumor was rapidly progressive, forming a finally exulcerating local tumor relapse and widespread metastases to the myocardium, lungs, liver, kidneys and skin. Similarities in morphology and biological behavior compared to patients with "triple-negative" (hormone receptor and Her2) monophasic sarcomatoid carcinomas and pure spindle cell sarcomas are discussed.

A differentiation towards myoepithelial cells has been demonstrated in several types of lesions in the breast. These include multifocal myoepitheliomatosis, the rare mixed tumor or pleomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma and myoepithelial carcinoma (malignant myoepithelioma). Myoepithelial carcinoma is the only lesion purely composed of myoepithelial cells. All these tumors are benign and/or of low-grade malignancy, with the exception of malignant myoepithelioma. In contrast to the statement of the current World Health Organization (WHO), recent studies have reported that regional and distant metastases may occur in about 50% of pure myoepithelial carcinomas. The presented case of a breast carcinoma with dominant myoepithelial/spindle cell differentiation in a 58-year-old woman is an excellent example to document the highly aggressive biological behavior of this tumor phenotype. Despite an extensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the tumor was rapidly progressive, forming a finally exulcerating local tumor relapse and widespread metastases to the myocardium, lungs, liver, kidneys and skin. Similarities in morphology and biological behavior compared to patients with "triple-negative" (hormone receptor and Her2) monophasic sarcomatoid carcinomas and pure spindle cell sarcomas are discussed.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 26 Aug 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 July 2009
Deposited On:26 Aug 2009 12:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0344-0338
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2009.06.004
PubMed ID:19616899
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20385

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations