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The heart of patients with aortic aneurysms: evidence from cardiac computed tomography


Stolzmann, P; Phan, C; Desbiolles, L; Lachat, M; Pfammatter, T; Marincek, B; Prokop, M; Alkadhi, H (2009). The heart of patients with aortic aneurysms: evidence from cardiac computed tomography. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 9(5):769-973.

Abstract

To determine in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) the coronary calcium burden and prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess the left ventricular (LV) function using cardiac computed tomography (CT). Sixty consecutive patients (six females; 72.2+/-9.0 years) with AAA underwent dual-source CT calcium scoring and coronary angiography prior to AAA repair. In the 60 patients, the Framingham risk score (FRS) ranged from 5-43%. Twenty patients (33%) were at low, 16 (27%) at intermediate, and 24 (40%) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The median Agatston score (AS) was 393 (0-3538). No significant correlation was found between AS and FRS (P=0.76). 846/851 coronary segments (99%) in 57/60 patients (95%) were depicted with a diagnostic image quality. Significant stenoses were found in 132/846 segments (16%) in 33/60 patients (55%). Five patients (8%) with significant coronary artery stenosis showed reduced LV function [ejection fraction (EF)<50%]. The extent of CAD was significantly correlated with AS (r=0.43, P<0.01), whereas no correlation was found for FRS (P=0.55). Cardiac CT is feasible in patients with AAA and allows for the assessment of coronary calcium, coronary stenoses, and LV function. The calcium burden and coronary stenoses assessment with cardiac CT provides incremental information beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors alone. Keywords: Coronary artery disease; Computed tomography; Coronary angiography; Aortic aneurysm.

To determine in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) the coronary calcium burden and prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess the left ventricular (LV) function using cardiac computed tomography (CT). Sixty consecutive patients (six females; 72.2+/-9.0 years) with AAA underwent dual-source CT calcium scoring and coronary angiography prior to AAA repair. In the 60 patients, the Framingham risk score (FRS) ranged from 5-43%. Twenty patients (33%) were at low, 16 (27%) at intermediate, and 24 (40%) at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The median Agatston score (AS) was 393 (0-3538). No significant correlation was found between AS and FRS (P=0.76). 846/851 coronary segments (99%) in 57/60 patients (95%) were depicted with a diagnostic image quality. Significant stenoses were found in 132/846 segments (16%) in 33/60 patients (55%). Five patients (8%) with significant coronary artery stenosis showed reduced LV function [ejection fraction (EF)<50%]. The extent of CAD was significantly correlated with AS (r=0.43, P<0.01), whereas no correlation was found for FRS (P=0.55). Cardiac CT is feasible in patients with AAA and allows for the assessment of coronary calcium, coronary stenoses, and LV function. The calcium burden and coronary stenoses assessment with cardiac CT provides incremental information beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors alone. Keywords: Coronary artery disease; Computed tomography; Coronary angiography; Aortic aneurysm.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:25 Sep 2009 07:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:21
Publisher:European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ISSN:1569-9285
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1510/icvts.2009.215145
PubMed ID:19706720
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20738

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