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Enhanced recovery of human spinothalamic function is associated with central neuropathic pain after SCI


Hari, A R; Wydenkeller, S; Dokladal, P; Halder, P (2009). Enhanced recovery of human spinothalamic function is associated with central neuropathic pain after SCI. Experimental Neurology, 216(2):428-430.

Abstract

Spinothalamic tract (STT) dysfunction seems to be crucially involved in the development of central neuropathic pain (NP) after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, previous attempts to identify differences in the extent or location of STT damage between subjects with and without NP failed. Here we show that the spontaneous recovery of human STT function (within the first year after SCI) in subjects suffering NP is enhanced compared to those not affected. Furthermore, the correlation between current pain intensity (assessed on average 5 years after SCI) and extent of functional recovery substantiates the close relationship between recovery of STT function and the occurrence of NP. These findings contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the generation of NP after SCI.

Spinothalamic tract (STT) dysfunction seems to be crucially involved in the development of central neuropathic pain (NP) after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, previous attempts to identify differences in the extent or location of STT damage between subjects with and without NP failed. Here we show that the spontaneous recovery of human STT function (within the first year after SCI) in subjects suffering NP is enhanced compared to those not affected. Furthermore, the correlation between current pain intensity (assessed on average 5 years after SCI) and extent of functional recovery substantiates the close relationship between recovery of STT function and the occurrence of NP. These findings contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the generation of NP after SCI.

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13 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2009
Deposited On:29 Sep 2009 10:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0014-4886
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2008.12.018
PubMed ID:19162017
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-20963

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