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The ataxia (axJ) mutation causes abnormal GABAA receptor turnover in mice


Lappe-Siefke, C; Loebrich, S; Hevers, W; Waidmann, O B; Schweizer, M; Fehr, S; Fritschy, J M; Dikic, I; Eilers, J; Wilson, S M; Kneussel, M (2009). The ataxia (axJ) mutation causes abnormal GABAA receptor turnover in mice. PLoS Genetics, 5(9):e1000631.

Abstract

Ataxia represents a pathological coordination failure that often involves functional disturbances in cerebellar circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs) characterize the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and critically participate in regulating motor coordination. Although different genetic mutations are known that cause ataxia, little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that a mutated ax(J) gene locus, encoding the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14), negatively influences synaptic receptor turnover. Ax(J) mouse mutants, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, display both increased GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) levels at PC surface membranes accompanied by enlarged IPSCs. Accordingly, we identify physical interaction of Usp14 and the GABA(A)R alpha1 subunit. Although other currently unknown changes might be involved, our data show that ubiquitin-dependent GABA(A)R turnover at cerebellar synapses contributes to ax(J)-mediated behavioural impairment.

Ataxia represents a pathological coordination failure that often involves functional disturbances in cerebellar circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs) characterize the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and critically participate in regulating motor coordination. Although different genetic mutations are known that cause ataxia, little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that a mutated ax(J) gene locus, encoding the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14), negatively influences synaptic receptor turnover. Ax(J) mouse mutants, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, display both increased GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) levels at PC surface membranes accompanied by enlarged IPSCs. Accordingly, we identify physical interaction of Usp14 and the GABA(A)R alpha1 subunit. Although other currently unknown changes might be involved, our data show that ubiquitin-dependent GABA(A)R turnover at cerebellar synapses contributes to ax(J)-mediated behavioural impairment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2009
Deposited On:05 Oct 2009 08:32
Last Modified:05 Oct 2016 07:37
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1553-7390
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000631
PubMed ID:19759851
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-21073

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