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Willi, Y; van Kleunen, M; Dietrich, S; Fischer, M (2007). Genetic rescue persists beyond first-generation outbreeding in small populations of a rare plant. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 274(1623):2357-2364.

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Abstract

Habitat fragmentation commonly causes genetic problems and reduced fitness when populations become small. Stocking small populations with individuals from other populations may enrich genetic variation and alleviate inbreeding, but such artificial gene flow is not commonly used in conservation owing to potential outbreeding depression. We addressed the role of long-term population size, genetic distance between populations and test environment for the performance of two generations of offspring from between-population crosses of the locally rare plant Ranunculus reptans L. Interpopulation outbreeding positively affected an aggregate measure of fitness, and the fitness superiority of interpopulation hybrids was maintained in the second offspring (F2) generation. Small populations benefited more strongly from interpopulation outbreeding. Genetic distance between crossed populations in neutral markers or quantitative characters was not important. These results were consistent under near-natural competition-free and competitive conditions. We conclude that the benefits of interpopulation outbreeding are likely to outweigh potential drawbacks, especially for populations that suffer from inbreeding.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:interpopulation gene flow, intraspecific hybridization, fitness, heterosis, hybrid breakdown, genomic divergence
Language:English
Date:22 September 2007
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 13:28
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 21:10
Publisher:Royal Society of London
ISSN:0962-8452
Publisher DOI:10.1098/rspb.2007.0768
PubMed ID:17623641
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 29
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