UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Repair of long-bone fractures in cats and small dogs with the Unilock mandible locking plate system


Voss, K; Kull, M A; Haessig, M; Montavon, P M (2009). Repair of long-bone fractures in cats and small dogs with the Unilock mandible locking plate system. Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology, 22(5):398-405.

Abstract

Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate stabilisation of long-bone fractures in cats and small dogs using the Unilock system. Methods: Medical histories and radiographs of consecutive patients with long-bone fractures stabilised with the Unilock system were reviewed. Cases with follow-up radiographs taken at least four weeks postoperatively were included. Signalment of the patient, fracture localisation and type, primary fracture repair or revision surgery, single or double plating, and complications for each patient were noted. Additionally, implant size, number of screws, number of cortices engaged with screws, and number of empty holes across the fracture were evaluated in fractures where a single plate had been applied. Results: Eighteen humeral, 18 radial, 20 femoral, and 10 tibial fractures were treated. The Unilock system was used for primary repair in 44 fractures and for revision surgery in 22 fractures. Two plates were applied in 17 fractures, and a single plate was applied in 49 fractures. Follow-up radiographs were taken four to 109 weeks postoperatively. Complications were seen in 12 animals and 13 fractures (19.7%). Fixation failure occurred in seven fractures (10.6%). Cases with a single plate that suffered fixation failure had thinner screws in relation to bone diameter than cases with double plates, and more screws in a main fragment than those without fixation failure. Clinical significance: The Unilock system is a suitable implant for fracture fixation of long bones in cats and small dogs.

Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate stabilisation of long-bone fractures in cats and small dogs using the Unilock system. Methods: Medical histories and radiographs of consecutive patients with long-bone fractures stabilised with the Unilock system were reviewed. Cases with follow-up radiographs taken at least four weeks postoperatively were included. Signalment of the patient, fracture localisation and type, primary fracture repair or revision surgery, single or double plating, and complications for each patient were noted. Additionally, implant size, number of screws, number of cortices engaged with screws, and number of empty holes across the fracture were evaluated in fractures where a single plate had been applied. Results: Eighteen humeral, 18 radial, 20 femoral, and 10 tibial fractures were treated. The Unilock system was used for primary repair in 44 fractures and for revision surgery in 22 fractures. Two plates were applied in 17 fractures, and a single plate was applied in 49 fractures. Follow-up radiographs were taken four to 109 weeks postoperatively. Complications were seen in 12 animals and 13 fractures (19.7%). Fixation failure occurred in seven fractures (10.6%). Cases with a single plate that suffered fixation failure had thinner screws in relation to bone diameter than cases with double plates, and more screws in a main fragment than those without fixation failure. Clinical significance: The Unilock system is a suitable implant for fracture fixation of long bones in cats and small dogs.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

179 downloads since deposited on 07 Oct 2009
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:07 Oct 2009 13:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:22
Publisher:Schattauer
ISSN:0932-0814
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-08-09-0084
Official URL:http://www.schattauer.de/de/magazine/uebersicht/zeitschriften-a-z/vcot/contents/archive/manuscript/11907.html
PubMed ID:19750288
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-21126

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations