UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Ultrasensitive quantitative HIV-1 p24 antigen assay adapted to dried plasma spots to improve treatment monitoring in low-resource settings.


Knuchel, M C; Tomasik, Z; Speck, R F; Lüthy, R; Schüpbach, J (2006). Ultrasensitive quantitative HIV-1 p24 antigen assay adapted to dried plasma spots to improve treatment monitoring in low-resource settings. Journal of Clinical Virology, 36(1):64-67.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Our group has previously developed a quantitative and ultrasensitive HIV-1 p24 antigen assay that is inexpensive, easy-to-perform, and can be carried out in low-resource settings. Since antiretroviral therapies are becoming more accessible in resource-constrained countries, methods to assess HIV-1 viraemia are urgently needed to achieve a high standard of care in HIV-1 management. OBJECTIVES: To adapt our quantitative assay to dried plasma spots (DPS), in order to further simplify this test and make it more accessible to resource-constrained countries. STUDY DESIGN: DPS from 47 HIV-seropositive, treated or untreated adult individuals and 30 healthy individuals were examined. RESULTS: A specificity of 100% was observed when p24 antigen was measured using DPS, and no differences of p24 concentration could be seen between DPS and venous plasma. The correlation between DPS and venous plasma p24 was excellent (R=0.93, CI(95%)=0.88-0.96, p<0.0001). Similarly, p24 antigen concentrations using DPS were well correlated with RNA viral load (R=0.53, CI(95%)=0.27-0.72, p=0.0002). CONCLUSIONS: This quantitative p24 antigen test has similar sensitivity and specificity using DPS and venous plasma, and has the potential to improve health care delivery to HIV-affected individuals in resource-constrained countries.

BACKGROUND: Our group has previously developed a quantitative and ultrasensitive HIV-1 p24 antigen assay that is inexpensive, easy-to-perform, and can be carried out in low-resource settings. Since antiretroviral therapies are becoming more accessible in resource-constrained countries, methods to assess HIV-1 viraemia are urgently needed to achieve a high standard of care in HIV-1 management. OBJECTIVES: To adapt our quantitative assay to dried plasma spots (DPS), in order to further simplify this test and make it more accessible to resource-constrained countries. STUDY DESIGN: DPS from 47 HIV-seropositive, treated or untreated adult individuals and 30 healthy individuals were examined. RESULTS: A specificity of 100% was observed when p24 antigen was measured using DPS, and no differences of p24 concentration could be seen between DPS and venous plasma. The correlation between DPS and venous plasma p24 was excellent (R=0.93, CI(95%)=0.88-0.96, p<0.0001). Similarly, p24 antigen concentrations using DPS were well correlated with RNA viral load (R=0.53, CI(95%)=0.27-0.72, p=0.0002). CONCLUSIONS: This quantitative p24 antigen test has similar sensitivity and specificity using DPS and venous plasma, and has the potential to improve health care delivery to HIV-affected individuals in resource-constrained countries.

Citations

12 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 May 2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1386-6532
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jcv.2005.12.005
PubMed ID:16431154

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations