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Prevention of vertical HIV transmission: additive protective effect of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis. Swiss Neonatal HIV Study Group.


Kind, C; Rudin, C; Siegrist, C A; Wyler, C A; Biedermann, K; Lauper, U; Irion, O; Schüpbach, J; Nadal, D (1998). Prevention of vertical HIV transmission: additive protective effect of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis. Swiss Neonatal HIV Study Group. AIDS, 12(2):205-210.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis on vertical HIV transmission. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Obstetric and paediatric clinics in Switzerland. PARTICIPANTS: Children of mothers with HIV infection identified before or at delivery. INTERVENTIONS: Routine use of elective Cesarean section for HIV-infected parturients by some Swiss centres since 1985. National recommendation for zidovudine prophylaxis in mid-1994. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: HIV infection status of children. RESULTS: In a cohort of 494 children born at least 6 months before the analysis date, 67 out of 414 children with known infection status were found to be infected, giving an overall transmission rate of 16.2% [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-18.51. Elective Cesarean section with intact membranes and without previous labour was associated with a lower transmission rate of 6% [odds ratio (OR), 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.70; P = 0.006 versus other delivery modes]. Transmission rate was intermediate after spontaneous delivery or non-elective Cesarean section (18%), and higher after obstetric interventions (27%; test for trend, P < 0.001). Since mid-1994, 78% of all women with registered pregnancies have received some form of zidovudine prophylaxis. Transmission rate was reduced from 17 to 7% after any zidovudine exposure (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.11-1.41). Combined use of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine resulted in a 0% transmission rate (none out of 31), compared with 8% (seven out of 86) after elective Cesarean section without zidovudine, 17% (four out of 24) after zidovudine alone, and 20% (55 out of 271) after no intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis appear to have an additive effect in the prevention of vertical HIV transmission.

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis on vertical HIV transmission. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Obstetric and paediatric clinics in Switzerland. PARTICIPANTS: Children of mothers with HIV infection identified before or at delivery. INTERVENTIONS: Routine use of elective Cesarean section for HIV-infected parturients by some Swiss centres since 1985. National recommendation for zidovudine prophylaxis in mid-1994. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: HIV infection status of children. RESULTS: In a cohort of 494 children born at least 6 months before the analysis date, 67 out of 414 children with known infection status were found to be infected, giving an overall transmission rate of 16.2% [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-18.51. Elective Cesarean section with intact membranes and without previous labour was associated with a lower transmission rate of 6% [odds ratio (OR), 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.70; P = 0.006 versus other delivery modes]. Transmission rate was intermediate after spontaneous delivery or non-elective Cesarean section (18%), and higher after obstetric interventions (27%; test for trend, P < 0.001). Since mid-1994, 78% of all women with registered pregnancies have received some form of zidovudine prophylaxis. Transmission rate was reduced from 17 to 7% after any zidovudine exposure (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.11-1.41). Combined use of elective Cesarean section and zidovudine resulted in a 0% transmission rate (none out of 31), compared with 8% (seven out of 86) after elective Cesarean section without zidovudine, 17% (four out of 24) after zidovudine alone, and 20% (55 out of 271) after no intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Elective Cesarean section and zidovudine prophylaxis appear to have an additive effect in the prevention of vertical HIV transmission.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:22 January 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0269-9370
Publisher DOI:10.1097/00002030-199802000-00011
Related URLs:http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/fulltext.00002030-199802000-00011.htm
PubMed ID:9468370

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