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Phylogenetic analysis and reclassification of caprine and ovine lentiviruses based on 104 new isolates: evidence for regular sheep-to-goat transmission and worldwide propagation through livestock trade.


Shah, C A; Böni, J; Huder, J B; Vogt, H R; Mühlherr, J; Zanoni, R; Miserez, R; Lutz, H; Schüpbach, J (2004). Phylogenetic analysis and reclassification of caprine and ovine lentiviruses based on 104 new isolates: evidence for regular sheep-to-goat transmission and worldwide propagation through livestock trade. Virology, 319(1):12-26.

Abstract

We performed a phylogenetic analysis of caprine and ovine lentiviruses using long sequences in gag and pol of 104 new Swiss isolates and six available corresponding database sequences. Forty-five isolates, forming five sequence clusters, were unclassifiable by the present classification. Pairwise DNA distance analysis indicated different categories of relatedness, requiring a new classification system. We propose four principal sequence groups, A-D, which differ by 25-37%. Groups A and B are further divided into subtypes which differ by 15-27%. Group D and four of the seven group A subtypes, A3, A4, A5 and A7, are formed by new Swiss isolates. Molecular epidemiology revealed that Swiss B1 strains differed no more from French, Brazilian or US strains than from each other, suggesting virus propagation through international livestock trade. Furthermore, infection of goats by subtypes A3 or A4 was significantly associated with documented contact with sheep, which also harbor these subtypes, thus indicating regularly occurring sheep-to-goat transmission.

We performed a phylogenetic analysis of caprine and ovine lentiviruses using long sequences in gag and pol of 104 new Swiss isolates and six available corresponding database sequences. Forty-five isolates, forming five sequence clusters, were unclassifiable by the present classification. Pairwise DNA distance analysis indicated different categories of relatedness, requiring a new classification system. We propose four principal sequence groups, A-D, which differ by 25-37%. Groups A and B are further divided into subtypes which differ by 15-27%. Group D and four of the seven group A subtypes, A3, A4, A5 and A7, are formed by new Swiss isolates. Molecular epidemiology revealed that Swiss B1 strains differed no more from French, Brazilian or US strains than from each other, suggesting virus propagation through international livestock trade. Furthermore, infection of goats by subtypes A3 or A4 was significantly associated with documented contact with sheep, which also harbor these subtypes, thus indicating regularly occurring sheep-to-goat transmission.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:5 February 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0042-6822
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.virol.2003.09.047
PubMed ID:14967484

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