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SHCS und die Labordiagnostik der HIV-Infektion - von der Entwicklung des HIV Western Blot über die Virusquantifizierung zur klinisch relevanten individuellen Viruscharakterisierung


Schüpbach, J (2004). SHCS und die Labordiagnostik der HIV-Infektion - von der Entwicklung des HIV Western Blot über die Virusquantifizierung zur klinisch relevanten individuellen Viruscharakterisierung. Therapeutische Umschau, 61(10):603-607.

Abstract

The first reliable diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of HIV infection, Western blot and ELISA, were created 20 years ago in the U.S., using initially sera from AIDS patients diagnosed clinically in Switzerland. In Swiss laboratories the diagnosis of HIV infection today is established by using 4th generation screening tests which detect both antibodies and p24 antigen while in the doctor's surgery a rapid antibody assay is used. Confirmation in authorized confirmatory labs relies on a set of different minimal combinations of positive test results derived from both the first and second blood specimen. In patients with a confirmed diagnosis of HIV infection, two further principal questions arise concerning, on the one hand, the virus load and, on the other hand, some clinically relevant properties of the infecting virus (type or subtype, resistance against antiretroviral drugs). The paper starts with a personal flashback to the first days of HIV diagnostics and describes the sensible use of tests available today for answering the above-mentioned principal questions. Alternative methods which can be used when standard tests fail or appear unreliable are mentioned also.

The first reliable diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of HIV infection, Western blot and ELISA, were created 20 years ago in the U.S., using initially sera from AIDS patients diagnosed clinically in Switzerland. In Swiss laboratories the diagnosis of HIV infection today is established by using 4th generation screening tests which detect both antibodies and p24 antigen while in the doctor's surgery a rapid antibody assay is used. Confirmation in authorized confirmatory labs relies on a set of different minimal combinations of positive test results derived from both the first and second blood specimen. In patients with a confirmed diagnosis of HIV infection, two further principal questions arise concerning, on the one hand, the virus load and, on the other hand, some clinically relevant properties of the infecting virus (type or subtype, resistance against antiretroviral drugs). The paper starts with a personal flashback to the first days of HIV diagnostics and describes the sensible use of tests available today for answering the above-mentioned principal questions. Alternative methods which can be used when standard tests fail or appear unreliable are mentioned also.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:SHCS and the laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection--from the development of the HIV Western blot to virus quantification and clinically relevant individual virus characterization
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1 October 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0040-5930
Publisher DOI:10.1024/0040-5930.61.10.603
PubMed ID:15532188
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2143

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