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Aerosol Indirect Effect Studies at Southern Great Plains during the May 2003 Intensive Operation Period


Feingold, G; Furrer, R; Pilewiskie, P; Remer, L A; Min, Q; Jonsson, H (2006). Aerosol Indirect Effect Studies at Southern Great Plains during the May 2003 Intensive Operation Period. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111:05.

Abstract

During May 2003 the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program conducted an Intensive Operations Period (IOP) to measure the radiative effects of aerosol and clouds. A suite of both in situ and remote sensing measurements were available to measure aerosol and cloud parameters. This paper has three main goals: First, it focuses on comparison between in situ retrievals of the radiatively important drop effective radius re and various satellite, airborne, and surface remote sensing retrievals of the same parameter. On 17 May 2003, there was a fortuitous, near-simultaneous sampling of a stratus cloud by five different methods. The retrievals of re agree with one another to within ~20%, which is approximately the error estimate for most methods. Second, a methodology for deriving a best estimate of re from these different instruments, with their different physical properties and sampling volumes, is proposed and applied to the 17 May event. Third, the paper examines the response of re to changes in aerosol on 3 days during the experiment and examines the consistency of remote sensing and in situ measurements of the effect of aerosol on re. It is shown that in spite of the generally good agreement in derived re, the magnitude of the response of re to changes in aerosol is quite sensitive to the method of retrieving re and to the aerosol proxy for cloud condensation nuclei. Nonphysical responses are sometimes noted, and it is suggested that further work needs to be done to refine these techniques.

During May 2003 the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program conducted an Intensive Operations Period (IOP) to measure the radiative effects of aerosol and clouds. A suite of both in situ and remote sensing measurements were available to measure aerosol and cloud parameters. This paper has three main goals: First, it focuses on comparison between in situ retrievals of the radiatively important drop effective radius re and various satellite, airborne, and surface remote sensing retrievals of the same parameter. On 17 May 2003, there was a fortuitous, near-simultaneous sampling of a stratus cloud by five different methods. The retrievals of re agree with one another to within ~20%, which is approximately the error estimate for most methods. Second, a methodology for deriving a best estimate of re from these different instruments, with their different physical properties and sampling volumes, is proposed and applied to the 17 May event. Third, the paper examines the response of re to changes in aerosol on 3 days during the experiment and examines the consistency of remote sensing and in situ measurements of the effect of aerosol on re. It is shown that in spite of the generally good agreement in derived re, the magnitude of the response of re to changes in aerosol is quite sensitive to the method of retrieving re and to the aerosol proxy for cloud condensation nuclei. Nonphysical responses are sometimes noted, and it is suggested that further work needs to be done to refine these techniques.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Mathematics
Dewey Decimal Classification:510 Mathematics
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:11 Jan 2010 14:30
Last Modified:09 May 2016 14:25
Publisher:American Geophysical Union
ISSN:0148-0227
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1029/2004JD005648
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-21609

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