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HIV-specific cellular immune response is inversely correlated with disease progression as defined by decline of CD4+ T cells in relation to HIV RNA load.


Oxenius, A; Price, D A; Hersberger, M; Schlaepfer, E; Weber, R; Weber, M; Kundig, T M; Böni, J; Joller, H; Phillips, R E; Flepp, M; Opravil, M; Speck, R F (2004). HIV-specific cellular immune response is inversely correlated with disease progression as defined by decline of CD4+ T cells in relation to HIV RNA load. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 189(7):1199-1208.

Abstract

The average time between infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome is approximately 8 years. However, progression rates vary widely, depending on several determinants, including HIV-specific immunity, host genetic factors, and virulence of the infecting strain. In untreated HIV-infected patients with different progression rates, we examined HIV-specific T cell responses in combination with host genetic markers, such as chemokine/chemokine-receptor (CCR) polymorphisms and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes. HIV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and, to a lesser extent, HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were inversely correlated with progression rate. Slower progression was not related to polymorphisms in CCR genes, HLA genotype, or GB virus C coinfection. These data suggest that HIV-specific T cell responses are involved in protecting the host from disease progression.

The average time between infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome is approximately 8 years. However, progression rates vary widely, depending on several determinants, including HIV-specific immunity, host genetic factors, and virulence of the infecting strain. In untreated HIV-infected patients with different progression rates, we examined HIV-specific T cell responses in combination with host genetic markers, such as chemokine/chemokine-receptor (CCR) polymorphisms and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes. HIV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and, to a lesser extent, HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were inversely correlated with progression rate. Slower progression was not related to polymorphisms in CCR genes, HLA genotype, or GB virus C coinfection. These data suggest that HIV-specific T cell responses are involved in protecting the host from disease progression.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0022-1899
Publisher DOI:10.1086/382028
PubMed ID:15031788
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2171

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