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Heat-mediated immune complex dissociation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay signal amplification render p24 antigen detection in plasma as sensitive as HIV-1 RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction


Schüpbach, J; Flepp, M; Pontelli, D; Tomasik, Z; Lüthy, R; Böni, J (1996). Heat-mediated immune complex dissociation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay signal amplification render p24 antigen detection in plasma as sensitive as HIV-1 RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction. AIDS, 10(10):1085-1090.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare heat denaturation and acidification as immune complex dissociation (ICD) methods in adult HIV-1 infection and to increase the sensitivity by a signal-amplification-boosted HIV-1 p24 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective blinded study of paired serum and plasma samples from 245 patients (112 of class A, 66 of B, 67 of C of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1993 classification). METHODS: Plasma and sera were prospectively tested for antigen by ELISA using native, acidified, or heat-denatured material. Retrospective tests included batch analysis of heat-denatured samples for antigen by the signal-amplification-boosted ELISA and for viral RNA. RESULTS: With serum, native antigen was reactive in 26.5%. Acidification increased the rate to 53.1% (P < or = 0.0001), but was inefficient at a CD4+ count > or = 500 x 10(6)/l. Heat denaturation further elevated the rate to 67.8% (P < or = 0.0007) and the use of plasma to 78.0% (P < or = 0.008). The boosted ELISA, performed with plasma samples diluted 1 :6, which eliminated the problem of heat-induced sample coagulation, was confirmed positive in 89.5% of serum and 97.8% of plasma samples. RNA was detected in 95.7%. CONCLUSION: Heat-mediated ICD combined with a signal-amplification-boosted ELISA detects HIV-1 expression as sensitively as a polymerase chain reaction kit for viral RNA, but at only a fraction of the cost. The procedure uses a 50 microliters plasma sample and should be fully automatable.

OBJECTIVE: To compare heat denaturation and acidification as immune complex dissociation (ICD) methods in adult HIV-1 infection and to increase the sensitivity by a signal-amplification-boosted HIV-1 p24 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective blinded study of paired serum and plasma samples from 245 patients (112 of class A, 66 of B, 67 of C of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1993 classification). METHODS: Plasma and sera were prospectively tested for antigen by ELISA using native, acidified, or heat-denatured material. Retrospective tests included batch analysis of heat-denatured samples for antigen by the signal-amplification-boosted ELISA and for viral RNA. RESULTS: With serum, native antigen was reactive in 26.5%. Acidification increased the rate to 53.1% (P < or = 0.0001), but was inefficient at a CD4+ count > or = 500 x 10(6)/l. Heat denaturation further elevated the rate to 67.8% (P < or = 0.0007) and the use of plasma to 78.0% (P < or = 0.008). The boosted ELISA, performed with plasma samples diluted 1 :6, which eliminated the problem of heat-induced sample coagulation, was confirmed positive in 89.5% of serum and 97.8% of plasma samples. RNA was detected in 95.7%. CONCLUSION: Heat-mediated ICD combined with a signal-amplification-boosted ELISA detects HIV-1 expression as sensitively as a polymerase chain reaction kit for viral RNA, but at only a fraction of the cost. The procedure uses a 50 microliters plasma sample and should be fully automatable.

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69 citations in Web of Science®
70 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 September 1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0269-9370
Related URLs:http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/abstract.00002030-199609000-00005.htm
PubMed ID:8874624

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