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Induction of apoptosis by Drosophila Myc


Montero, L; Müller, N; Gallant, P (2008). Induction of apoptosis by Drosophila Myc. Genesis: The Journal of Genetics and Development, 46(2):104-111.

Abstract

Myc proteins are essential regulators of cellular growth and proliferation during normal development. Activating mutations in myc genes result in excessive growth and are frequently associated with human cancers. At the same time, forced expression of Myc sensitizes vertebrate cells towards different pro-apoptotic stimuli. Recently, the ability of overexpressed Myc to induce cell-autonomous apoptosis has been shown to be evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Here, we show that dMyc induced apoptosis is accompanied by the induction of Drosophila p53 mRNA, but that dp53 activity is not essential for dMyc’s ability to induce apoptosis. Conversely, larvae carrying a hypomorphic dmyc mutation are more resistant to the apoptosis-promoting effects of X-irradiation. These data suggest that the control of apoptosis is a physiological function of Myc and that dMyc might play a role in the response to DNA damage.

Myc proteins are essential regulators of cellular growth and proliferation during normal development. Activating mutations in myc genes result in excessive growth and are frequently associated with human cancers. At the same time, forced expression of Myc sensitizes vertebrate cells towards different pro-apoptotic stimuli. Recently, the ability of overexpressed Myc to induce cell-autonomous apoptosis has been shown to be evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Here, we show that dMyc induced apoptosis is accompanied by the induction of Drosophila p53 mRNA, but that dp53 activity is not essential for dMyc’s ability to induce apoptosis. Conversely, larvae carrying a hypomorphic dmyc mutation are more resistant to the apoptosis-promoting effects of X-irradiation. These data suggest that the control of apoptosis is a physiological function of Myc and that dMyc might play a role in the response to DNA damage.

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26 citations in Web of Science®
27 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Myc, p53, apoptosis, growth, X-rays, DNA damage, Drosophila
Language:English
Date:1 February 2008
Deposited On:26 Feb 2008 10:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1526-954X
Additional Information:The attached file is a preprint (accepted version) of an article published in Genesis, 46(2):104-111.
Publisher DOI:10.1002/dvg.20373
PubMed ID:18257071
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2257

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