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3-Tesla high-resolution MR imaging of the wrist


Saupe, N (2009). 3-Tesla high-resolution MR imaging of the wrist. Seminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology, 13(1):29-38.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T has become increasingly available for clinical usage. Its clinical impact on diagnostic outcome compared with 1.5 T still remains unclear, however, because no larger case series have been published until now. In addition, the further development of clinical applications is still limited at 3.0 T due to the lack of availability of dedicated coils and the sensitivity of 3.0 T to artifacts. However, especially in the MR imaging of small joints, there seems to be a great potential in improving the diagnostic performance of MRI with increased signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the spatial resolution. For MR imaging of the wrist, smaller case series describe better visualization of the interosseus ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage complex at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T using comparable coils and imaging protocols. The diagnostic performance in the detection of cartilage lesions still remains unclear, as it remains independent of field strength on the anatomical location. This article addresses the technical considerations of using 3.0 T for wrist imaging and the initial results on clinical applications, focusing on optimized techniques for wrist imaging and the diagnostic accuracy in the detection of cartilage lesions and the important anatomical structures.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T has become increasingly available for clinical usage. Its clinical impact on diagnostic outcome compared with 1.5 T still remains unclear, however, because no larger case series have been published until now. In addition, the further development of clinical applications is still limited at 3.0 T due to the lack of availability of dedicated coils and the sensitivity of 3.0 T to artifacts. However, especially in the MR imaging of small joints, there seems to be a great potential in improving the diagnostic performance of MRI with increased signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the spatial resolution. For MR imaging of the wrist, smaller case series describe better visualization of the interosseus ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage complex at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T using comparable coils and imaging protocols. The diagnostic performance in the detection of cartilage lesions still remains unclear, as it remains independent of field strength on the anatomical location. This article addresses the technical considerations of using 3.0 T for wrist imaging and the initial results on clinical applications, focusing on optimized techniques for wrist imaging and the diagnostic accuracy in the detection of cartilage lesions and the important anatomical structures.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:19 Oct 2009 12:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:30
Publisher:Thieme
ISSN:1089-7860
Additional Information:Copyright: Georg Thieme Verlag
Publisher DOI:10.1055/s-0029-1202243
PubMed ID:19235670
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23250

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