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Zoo and wildlife medical education: a European perspective


Frölich, K; Grabitzky, S E; Walzer, C; Delahay, R J; Dorrestein, G M; Hatt, J M (2006). Zoo and wildlife medical education: a European perspective. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 33(3):401-407.

Abstract

Europe has a long and distinguished history in veterinary science and education, and it was here that the first professional investigations of pathological conditions in zoo animals took place. However, despite an increasing number of veterinarians working with wildlife, education in zoological and wildlife medicine has only recently become part of formal veterinary training at the undergraduate level. Consequently, current educational opportunities in zoological and wildlife medicine vary widely throughout Europe, both in availability and in composition. The need to establish agreed standards in education across Europe and to foster the mobility of students and teaching staff are reflected by international agreements such as the Bologna Treaty and the ERASMUS-SOCRATES program. Europe is also home to a number of voluntary professional organizations, such as the European Wildlife Disease Association and the European Association of Zoo and Wildlife Veterinarians, that actively promote the inclusion of zoological and wildlife medicine in veterinary education. Zoo and wildlife medicine is currently a veterinary specialization in Europe, but educational opportunities are likely to increase in availability in the future.

Europe has a long and distinguished history in veterinary science and education, and it was here that the first professional investigations of pathological conditions in zoo animals took place. However, despite an increasing number of veterinarians working with wildlife, education in zoological and wildlife medicine has only recently become part of formal veterinary training at the undergraduate level. Consequently, current educational opportunities in zoological and wildlife medicine vary widely throughout Europe, both in availability and in composition. The need to establish agreed standards in education across Europe and to foster the mobility of students and teaching staff are reflected by international agreements such as the Bologna Treaty and the ERASMUS-SOCRATES program. Europe is also home to a number of voluntary professional organizations, such as the European Wildlife Disease Association and the European Association of Zoo and Wildlife Veterinarians, that actively promote the inclusion of zoological and wildlife medicine in veterinary education. Zoo and wildlife medicine is currently a veterinary specialization in Europe, but educational opportunities are likely to increase in availability in the future.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:23 Apr 2008 14:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges
ISSN:0748-321X
Publisher DOI:10.3138/jvme.33.3.401
PubMed ID:17035214
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2340

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