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Prospective and Retrospective Memory Complaints in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Alzheimer’s Disease


Eschen, A; Martin, Mike; Schreiter-Gasser, U; Kliegel, M (2009). Prospective and Retrospective Memory Complaints in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Alzheimer’s Disease. Brain Impairment, 10(1):59-75.

Abstract

Current management attempts for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) focus on the identification
of individuals in the preclinical stage. This has led to the development
of the diagnostic concept of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which applies
to individuals with declining cognitive abilities but largely preserved everyday
functioning. Previous findings indicate that prospective memory deficits are a sensitive
marker of preclinical AD and that awareness of prospective memory failures
is particularly high, based on its dependence on executive functions. Thus, the
goal of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of subjective prospective versus
retrospective memory complaints for an initial screening for MCI and their
respective associations with executive functions. 71 healthy older adults, 27 MCI
patients, and 9 patients with mild AD completed the Prospective and
Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) and three executive functions
tests. The healthy and the MCI group could not be distinguished by their level of
subjective prospective or retrospective memory complaints, but the mild AD
patients differed from the other groups by complaining more about retrospective
than prospective memory failures. For the healthy older adults, the prospective
memory complaints were correlated to an inhibition test, whereas they did not
correlate with any of the executive function tests in the MCI patients. In contrast,
in both groups the retrospective memory complaints were related to a task
switching test. The findings are discussed with respect to differences between the
three groups in cognitive abilities, attention to failures of, use of mnemonic aids
for, and everyday demands of prospective and retrospective memory.

Current management attempts for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) focus on the identification
of individuals in the preclinical stage. This has led to the development
of the diagnostic concept of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which applies
to individuals with declining cognitive abilities but largely preserved everyday
functioning. Previous findings indicate that prospective memory deficits are a sensitive
marker of preclinical AD and that awareness of prospective memory failures
is particularly high, based on its dependence on executive functions. Thus, the
goal of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of subjective prospective versus
retrospective memory complaints for an initial screening for MCI and their
respective associations with executive functions. 71 healthy older adults, 27 MCI
patients, and 9 patients with mild AD completed the Prospective and
Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) and three executive functions
tests. The healthy and the MCI group could not be distinguished by their level of
subjective prospective or retrospective memory complaints, but the mild AD
patients differed from the other groups by complaining more about retrospective
than prospective memory failures. For the healthy older adults, the prospective
memory complaints were correlated to an inhibition test, whereas they did not
correlate with any of the executive function tests in the MCI patients. In contrast,
in both groups the retrospective memory complaints were related to a task
switching test. The findings are discussed with respect to differences between the
three groups in cognitive abilities, attention to failures of, use of mnemonic aids
for, and everyday demands of prospective and retrospective memory.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:May 2009
Deposited On:05 Nov 2009 15:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:31
Publisher:Australian Academic Press
ISSN:1443-9646
Additional Information:SPECIAL ISSUE - Prospective Memory
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/ 10.1375/brim.10.1.59
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23491

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