UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Factor structure and measurement invariance of the cognitive failures questionnaire across the adult life span


Rast, P; Zimprich, D; Van Boxtel, M; Jolles, J (2009). Factor structure and measurement invariance of the cognitive failures questionnaire across the adult life span. Assessment, 16(2):145-158.

Abstract

The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) is designed to assess a person’s proneness to committing cognitive slips
and errors in the completion of everyday tasks. Although the CFQ is a widely used instrument, its factor structure
remains an issue of scientific debate. The present study used data of a representative sample (N = 1,303, 24-83 years
of age) from the Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS) to test and compare factor solutions for the CFQ previously
reported in the literature by means of confirmatory factor analysis of ordered categorical variables. A three-factor
model of the CFQ from an exploratory factor analysis was tested for increasing levels of measurement invariance
across six age groups. Factor (co-)variances remained stable across the age groups, mean differences were observed
for the factor Forgetfulness with higher means for older participants, and the factor Distractibility where participants
older than 60 years of age had lower means.

The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) is designed to assess a person’s proneness to committing cognitive slips
and errors in the completion of everyday tasks. Although the CFQ is a widely used instrument, its factor structure
remains an issue of scientific debate. The present study used data of a representative sample (N = 1,303, 24-83 years
of age) from the Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS) to test and compare factor solutions for the CFQ previously
reported in the literature by means of confirmatory factor analysis of ordered categorical variables. A three-factor
model of the CFQ from an exploratory factor analysis was tested for increasing levels of measurement invariance
across six age groups. Factor (co-)variances remained stable across the age groups, mean differences were observed
for the factor Forgetfulness with higher means for older participants, and the factor Distractibility where participants
older than 60 years of age had lower means.

Citations

30 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

188 downloads since deposited on 05 Nov 2009
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:June 2009
Deposited On:05 Nov 2009 16:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:31
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:1073-1911
Publisher DOI:10.1177/1073191108324440
PubMed ID:19066391
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23493

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 511kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations