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Dicrocoeliasis in New World camelids


Wenker, C; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Ossent, Pete; Hänichen, T; Brack, A; Isenbügel, Erwin (1998). Dicrocoeliasis in New World camelids. Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere, 26(6):355-361.

Abstract

Natural infections with the lancet fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were detected in a group of seven diseased or dead/euthanized South American Camelids (five Llamas, two Alpacas) from Switzerland and Southern Germany. Clinical findings in almost all the animals revealed an acute decline of general condition followed by recumbency, decreased body temperature and a varying degree of anaemia. Concurrently, all animals showed an average to poor nutritional status. All liver enzyme activities analysed in serum biochemistry conformed to the reference values and therefore offered no diagnostic clues for this disease. Necropsy however, disclosed major alterations in the liver in the form of cirrhosis, abscesses, granulomas, and a massive infestation with D. dendriticum. The coprological investigations performed at the outset of the examinations revealed eggs of the lancet fluke in only two animals. This suggests that clinical findings alone permit at best only a provisional diagnosis. Repeated coprologic follow-ups showed that the presence of eggs of D. dendriticum can be diagnosed accurately and that clinical signs appear with an excretion rate above 1000 eggs per gram faeces (EpG). In these cases, praziquantel in a single dose of 50 mg/kg per os was given. This treatment was well tolerated and achieved a quite acceptable 90% reduction of eggs in the faeces.

Natural infections with the lancet fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were detected in a group of seven diseased or dead/euthanized South American Camelids (five Llamas, two Alpacas) from Switzerland and Southern Germany. Clinical findings in almost all the animals revealed an acute decline of general condition followed by recumbency, decreased body temperature and a varying degree of anaemia. Concurrently, all animals showed an average to poor nutritional status. All liver enzyme activities analysed in serum biochemistry conformed to the reference values and therefore offered no diagnostic clues for this disease. Necropsy however, disclosed major alterations in the liver in the form of cirrhosis, abscesses, granulomas, and a massive infestation with D. dendriticum. The coprological investigations performed at the outset of the examinations revealed eggs of the lancet fluke in only two animals. This suggests that clinical findings alone permit at best only a provisional diagnosis. Repeated coprologic follow-ups showed that the presence of eggs of D. dendriticum can be diagnosed accurately and that clinical signs appear with an excretion rate above 1000 eggs per gram faeces (EpG). In these cases, praziquantel in a single dose of 50 mg/kg per os was given. This treatment was well tolerated and achieved a quite acceptable 90% reduction of eggs in the faeces.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:German
Date:1998
Deposited On:28 Apr 2008 07:50
Last Modified:01 Jul 2016 07:49
Publisher:Schattauer
ISSN:1434-1220
PubMed ID:9857415

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