UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mineral absorption in tapirs (Tapirusspp.) as compared to the domestic horse


Clauss, Marcus; Lang-Deuerling, S; Kienzle, E; Medici, E P; Hummel, J (2009). Mineral absorption in tapirs (Tapirusspp.) as compared to the domestic horse. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 93(6):768-776.

Abstract

In order to test whether mineral recommendations for horses are likely to guarantee adequate mineral provision for tapirs (Tapirus spp.), we investigated the apparent absorption (aA) of macro- and microminerals in 18 tapirs from 5 zoological institutions in a total of 24 feeding trials with total faecal collection. Feeds and faeces were analysed for Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Cu, and Zn. The resulting aA coefficients, and the linear relationships of apparently absorbable dietary mineral content to total dietary mineral content (per 100g dry matter), were compared to data for domestic horses. While there were no apparent differences in the absorption patterns for P, K, Na, K, Fe, Cu or Zn, both Ca and Mg absorption were distinctively higher in tapirs than in horses. Tapirs are browsers that are adaptaed to a diet of higher Ca content and higher Ca:P ratio than equids, and high absorptive efficiency for Ca might have evolved to ensure that high dietary Ca concentrations to not bind dietary P in the intestine and thus make it unavailable for hindgut microbes. Like in other hindgut fermenters, absorption coefficients for Ca increased with dietary Ca:P ratio, and urinary Ca:creatinine ratios increased with dietary Ca. Several zoo diets used were deficient in one or more minerals. When compared to faeces from free-ranging animals, faeces from zoo animals had higher concentrations of most minerals, probably indicating a lesser diluting effect of indgestible fibre in zoo animals.

In order to test whether mineral recommendations for horses are likely to guarantee adequate mineral provision for tapirs (Tapirus spp.), we investigated the apparent absorption (aA) of macro- and microminerals in 18 tapirs from 5 zoological institutions in a total of 24 feeding trials with total faecal collection. Feeds and faeces were analysed for Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Cu, and Zn. The resulting aA coefficients, and the linear relationships of apparently absorbable dietary mineral content to total dietary mineral content (per 100g dry matter), were compared to data for domestic horses. While there were no apparent differences in the absorption patterns for P, K, Na, K, Fe, Cu or Zn, both Ca and Mg absorption were distinctively higher in tapirs than in horses. Tapirs are browsers that are adaptaed to a diet of higher Ca content and higher Ca:P ratio than equids, and high absorptive efficiency for Ca might have evolved to ensure that high dietary Ca concentrations to not bind dietary P in the intestine and thus make it unavailable for hindgut microbes. Like in other hindgut fermenters, absorption coefficients for Ca increased with dietary Ca:P ratio, and urinary Ca:creatinine ratios increased with dietary Ca. Several zoo diets used were deficient in one or more minerals. When compared to faeces from free-ranging animals, faeces from zoo animals had higher concentrations of most minerals, probably indicating a lesser diluting effect of indgestible fibre in zoo animals.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

156 downloads since deposited on 18 Nov 2009
21 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Nov 2009 12:29
Last Modified:07 Sep 2016 08:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0931-2439
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0396.2008.00865.x
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23776

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations