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The intensity of downbeat nystagmus during daytime


Spiegel, R; Rettinger, N; Kalla, R; Lehnen, N; Straumann, D; Brandt, T; Glasauer, S; Strupp, M (2009). The intensity of downbeat nystagmus during daytime. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1164:293-299.

Abstract

On the basis of reports by patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) that their symptoms were worse during the morning but better during the daytime, we investigated whether the intensity of DBN changes during the daytime. DBN was measured at 9 am, 11 am, and 1 pm. The mean peak slow phase velocity (MPSPV) of DBN was determined in different eye positions, with and without fixation, as well as in three different body positions: sitting upright, lying supine with the nose up, and lying prone with the nose down. Twelve patients with DBN either due to cerebellar degeneration or of idiopathic etiology were examined. The major findings of this study were as follows. First, the intensity of DBN significantly decreased during the daytime. When measured in the sitting upright position and primary eye position, MPSPV decreased from 4.32 deg/sec (+/-SEM 1.02) at 9 am to 2.12 deg/sec (+/- 0.5) at 11 am (P < 0.01) and stayed constant around 1.93 deg/sec (+/- 0.57) at 1 pm (P < 0.01 from 9 am to 1 pm) and 2.08 deg/sec (+/- 0.75) at 3 pm (P < 0.01 from 9 am to 3 pm). Second, this change did not depend on fixation during the measurements. Third, this effect was not influenced by the eye position during the measurements (upward, downward, or straight ahead). Our data show that the intensity of DBN decreases during the daytime. This decrease correlates with the symptoms of the patients. This change during daytime did not depend on visual fixation. Another possible mechanism is the modulation of DBN by head position relative to gravity, that is, by otolith input. This should be evaluated in further studies.

On the basis of reports by patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) that their symptoms were worse during the morning but better during the daytime, we investigated whether the intensity of DBN changes during the daytime. DBN was measured at 9 am, 11 am, and 1 pm. The mean peak slow phase velocity (MPSPV) of DBN was determined in different eye positions, with and without fixation, as well as in three different body positions: sitting upright, lying supine with the nose up, and lying prone with the nose down. Twelve patients with DBN either due to cerebellar degeneration or of idiopathic etiology were examined. The major findings of this study were as follows. First, the intensity of DBN significantly decreased during the daytime. When measured in the sitting upright position and primary eye position, MPSPV decreased from 4.32 deg/sec (+/-SEM 1.02) at 9 am to 2.12 deg/sec (+/- 0.5) at 11 am (P < 0.01) and stayed constant around 1.93 deg/sec (+/- 0.57) at 1 pm (P < 0.01 from 9 am to 1 pm) and 2.08 deg/sec (+/- 0.75) at 3 pm (P < 0.01 from 9 am to 3 pm). Second, this change did not depend on fixation during the measurements. Third, this effect was not influenced by the eye position during the measurements (upward, downward, or straight ahead). Our data show that the intensity of DBN decreases during the daytime. This decrease correlates with the symptoms of the patients. This change during daytime did not depend on visual fixation. Another possible mechanism is the modulation of DBN by head position relative to gravity, that is, by otolith input. This should be evaluated in further studies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Nov 2009 14:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:32
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0077-8923
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.03865.x
PubMed ID:19645914
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23884

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