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Progressive vestibular impairment in patients with polyneuropathy


Straumann, D; Schmid-Priscoveanu, A; Studer, A; Hess, K; Palla, A (2009). Progressive vestibular impairment in patients with polyneuropathy. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1164:239-241.

Abstract

It is generally assumed that imbalance in patients with polyneuropathy (PNP) results from deficient proprioceptive input arriving from the lower limbs. Polyneuropathic processes, however, may also impair vestibular function. In fact, we observed that two-thirds of patients with PNP show unilateral or bilateral impairment of vestibular function as assessed with search-coil head impulse testing. In the present work, we analyzed the same database of 37 polyneuropathic patients to find out whether the presence of a unilateral or bilateral vestibular deficit reflects a progression of the vestibular impairment. Results suggest that vestibular function in PNP patients deteriorates asymmetrically, first affecting one side and later both sides.

It is generally assumed that imbalance in patients with polyneuropathy (PNP) results from deficient proprioceptive input arriving from the lower limbs. Polyneuropathic processes, however, may also impair vestibular function. In fact, we observed that two-thirds of patients with PNP show unilateral or bilateral impairment of vestibular function as assessed with search-coil head impulse testing. In the present work, we analyzed the same database of 37 polyneuropathic patients to find out whether the presence of a unilateral or bilateral vestibular deficit reflects a progression of the vestibular impairment. Results suggest that vestibular function in PNP patients deteriorates asymmetrically, first affecting one side and later both sides.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Nov 2009 14:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:32
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0077-8923
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.03873.x
PubMed ID:19645906
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-23885

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