UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

An isthmus at the caecocolical junction is an anatomical feature of domestic and wild equids


Clauss, Marcus; Hummel, J; Schwarm, A; Steuer, P; Fritz, J; Martin Jurado, O; Tschudin, A; Hatt, J M (2008). An isthmus at the caecocolical junction is an anatomical feature of domestic and wild equids. European Journal of Wildlife Research, 54(2):347-351.

Abstract

The isthmus at the caecocolical junction in domestic equids is well described. Like another isthmus between the ansa proximalis coli (the colonic fermentation chamber or ‘large colon’) and the colon transversum (the distal or ‘small’ colon), this spot represents not only a potential anatomical feature contributing to particle ingesta retention but also an explicit predilection site for intestinal obstructions. The question whether this anatomical feature also occurs in wild equids is therefore of both physiological and medical interest but has not been addressed so far. In this paper, we report dissections of the large intestine of a domestic pony (Equus caballus f. dom.), a Przewalski horse (Equus przewalski) and a plains zebra (Equus burchelli). The intestinal tract section of all three animals were similar in length; each species displayed the caecocolical isthmus as well as the abrupt narrowing of the intestinal tract between the ‘large’ and the ‘small’ colon. Graphical descriptions of wild equid gastrointestinal anatomy should include these features.

The isthmus at the caecocolical junction in domestic equids is well described. Like another isthmus between the ansa proximalis coli (the colonic fermentation chamber or ‘large colon’) and the colon transversum (the distal or ‘small’ colon), this spot represents not only a potential anatomical feature contributing to particle ingesta retention but also an explicit predilection site for intestinal obstructions. The question whether this anatomical feature also occurs in wild equids is therefore of both physiological and medical interest but has not been addressed so far. In this paper, we report dissections of the large intestine of a domestic pony (Equus caballus f. dom.), a Przewalski horse (Equus przewalski) and a plains zebra (Equus burchelli). The intestinal tract section of all three animals were similar in length; each species displayed the caecocolical isthmus as well as the abrupt narrowing of the intestinal tract between the ‘large’ and the ‘small’ colon. Graphical descriptions of wild equid gastrointestinal anatomy should include these features.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

180 downloads since deposited on 28 Apr 2008
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:28 Apr 2008 09:06
Last Modified:07 Sep 2016 08:41
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1439-0574
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10344-007-0126-y
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2440

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 344kB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 101kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations