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Karuna, R; von Eckardstein, A; Rentsch, K M (2009). Dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the quantification of 27-hydroxycholesterol in plasma. Journal of Chromatography B, 877(3):261-268.

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Abstract

27-Hydroxycholesterol (27OH-Chol) is of potential diagnostic interest due to its role in maintaining whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Dopant assisted-atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) has improved the sensitivity of 27OH-Chol analysis, in comparison to the published LC-APCI-MS method, allowing quantification from a very low amount of sample (<or=50 microL plasma). The method was validated for quantification from 50 microL and 15 microL plasma, with the limit of quantification (LOQ) of 10 ng/mL and 40 ng/mL plasma, respectively. A further advantage is that no prior derivatization was needed, unlike the LC-ESI-MS or the standard GC-MS method. The method validation also resulted in good linearity and recovery of 91-106%. The within-day and between-day coefficient of variation were less than 15% while giving the accuracy of 90.9-113.4%. This report summarizes the effects of some critical parameters on the ionization of 27OH-Chol using APPI, as well as the validation of the method. The sensitivity achieved with DA-APPI broadens the usefulness of the LC-MS method in clinical applications.

Citations

20 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
DDC:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:30 Nov 2009 15:31
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 01:42
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1570-0232 (P) 1873-376X (E)
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jchromb.2008.12.033
PubMed ID:19121981

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