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The face of Siamopithecus: New geometric-morphometric evidence for its anthropoid status


Zollikofer, C P E; Ponce de León, M S; Chaimanee, Y; Lebrun, R; Tafforeau, P; Khansubhaand, S; Jäger, J J (2009). The face of Siamopithecus: New geometric-morphometric evidence for its anthropoid status. Anatomical Record, 292(11):1734-1744.

Abstract

Amphipithecids assume a key position in early primate evolution in Asia. Here we report on new maxillofacial and associated mandibular remains of Siamopithecus eocaenus,
an amphipithecid primate from the Late Eocene of Krabi (Thailand) that currently represents the most complete specimen belonging to this group. We used synchrotron microtomography and techniques of virtual reconstruction to recover the three-dimensional morphology of the specimen. Geometric-morphometric analysis of the reconstructed specimen within a comparative sample of recent and fossil primates clearly associates Siamopithecus with the anthropoids. Like modern anthropoids, Siamopithecus displays a relatively short face and highly convergent
and frontated orbits, the lower rim of which lies well
above the alveolar plane. The cooccurrence of spatially correlated anthropoid features and classical anthropoid dental characters in one individual represents a strong argument to support the anthropoid status of Siamopithecus.
It is, thus, highly unlikely that amphipithecids are specialized adapiforms exhibiting complete convergence
with anthropoids. Anat Rec,292:1734–1744, 2009.

Amphipithecids assume a key position in early primate evolution in Asia. Here we report on new maxillofacial and associated mandibular remains of Siamopithecus eocaenus,
an amphipithecid primate from the Late Eocene of Krabi (Thailand) that currently represents the most complete specimen belonging to this group. We used synchrotron microtomography and techniques of virtual reconstruction to recover the three-dimensional morphology of the specimen. Geometric-morphometric analysis of the reconstructed specimen within a comparative sample of recent and fossil primates clearly associates Siamopithecus with the anthropoids. Like modern anthropoids, Siamopithecus displays a relatively short face and highly convergent
and frontated orbits, the lower rim of which lies well
above the alveolar plane. The cooccurrence of spatially correlated anthropoid features and classical anthropoid dental characters in one individual represents a strong argument to support the anthropoid status of Siamopithecus.
It is, thus, highly unlikely that amphipithecids are specialized adapiforms exhibiting complete convergence
with anthropoids. Anat Rec,292:1734–1744, 2009.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:15 Jan 2010 11:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1932-8486
Publisher DOI:10.1002/ar.20998
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-24563

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