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Glucose reverses fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus of mice


Becskei, C; Lutz, T A; Riediger, T (2008). Glucose reverses fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus of mice. NeuroReport, 19(1):105-109.

Abstract

The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is an important target for metabolic and hormonal signals controlling food intake. As demonstrated by c-Fos studies, arcuate neurons are activated in food deprived mice, while refeeding reverses the fasting-induced activation. To evaluate whether an increase in blood glucose has an inhibitory effect on these neurons, we analyzed the c-Fos response to an intraperitoneal glucose injection in fasted mice. This treatment increased blood glucose levels twofold and reduced 2h food intake. Similar to refeeding, it also reversed the fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, an increase in blood glucose might be an important feeding-related signal acting via the arcuate nucleus to oppose orexigenic stimuli.

The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is an important target for metabolic and hormonal signals controlling food intake. As demonstrated by c-Fos studies, arcuate neurons are activated in food deprived mice, while refeeding reverses the fasting-induced activation. To evaluate whether an increase in blood glucose has an inhibitory effect on these neurons, we analyzed the c-Fos response to an intraperitoneal glucose injection in fasted mice. This treatment increased blood glucose levels twofold and reduced 2h food intake. Similar to refeeding, it also reversed the fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, an increase in blood glucose might be an important feeding-related signal acting via the arcuate nucleus to oppose orexigenic stimuli.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:8 January 2008
Deposited On:20 May 2008 09:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:23
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0959-4965
Additional Information:This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in NeuroReport 2008, 19(1):105-109.
Publisher DOI:10.1097/WNR.0b013e3282f380a2
Official URL:http://www.neuroreport.com/pt/re/neuroreport/abstract.00001756-200801080-00020.htm
PubMed ID:18281902
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2501

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