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Social neuroeconomics: the neural circuitry of social preferences


Fehr, Ernst; Camerer, Colin F (2007). Social neuroeconomics: the neural circuitry of social preferences. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11(10):419-427.

Abstract

Combining the methods of neuroscience and economics generates powerful tools for studying the brain processes behind human social interaction. We argue that hedonic interpretations of theories of social preferences provide a useful framework that generates interesting predictions and helps interpret brain activations involved in altruistic, fair and trusting behaviors. These behaviours are consistently associated with activation in reward-related brain areas such as the striatum and with prefrontal
activity implicated in cognitive control, the processing of emotions, and integration of benefits and costs, consistent with resolution of a conflict between self-interest and
other-regarding motives.

Combining the methods of neuroscience and economics generates powerful tools for studying the brain processes behind human social interaction. We argue that hedonic interpretations of theories of social preferences provide a useful framework that generates interesting predictions and helps interpret brain activations involved in altruistic, fair and trusting behaviors. These behaviours are consistently associated with activation in reward-related brain areas such as the striatum and with prefrontal
activity implicated in cognitive control, the processing of emotions, and integration of benefits and costs, consistent with resolution of a conflict between self-interest and
other-regarding motives.

Citations

265 citations in Web of Science®
281 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:October 2007
Deposited On:06 Jun 2008 07:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:23
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1364-6613
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.tics.2007.09.002
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2518

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