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Climate change and tourism in the alpine regions of Switzerland


Bürki, R; Abegg, B; Elsasser, H (2007). Climate change and tourism in the alpine regions of Switzerland. In: Amelung, B; et al. Climate change and tourism: assessment and coping strategies. Maastricht: Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln, 165-172.

Abstract

For many alpine areas in Switzerland, winter tourism is the most important source of income, and snow-reliability is one of the key elements of the offers made by tourism in the Alps. 85% of Switzerland’s current ski resorts can be designated as snow-reliable. If climate change occurs, the level of snow-reliability will rise from 1200 m up to 1800 m over the next few decades. Only 44% of the ski resorts wouldthen still be snow-reliable. While some regions may be able to maintain their winter tourism with suitable adaptation strategies, others would lose winter tourism due to a diminishing snow pack. Climate change must be viewed as a catalyst that is reinforcing and accelerating the pace of structural changes in tourism. Today, adaptation strategies are predominant in tourism (e.g. artificial snow production). As an industry that will be severely affected by climate change, however, tourism will increasingly have to focus on mitigation strategies (e.g. less greenhouse gas emissions by tourism traffic).

For many alpine areas in Switzerland, winter tourism is the most important source of income, and snow-reliability is one of the key elements of the offers made by tourism in the Alps. 85% of Switzerland’s current ski resorts can be designated as snow-reliable. If climate change occurs, the level of snow-reliability will rise from 1200 m up to 1800 m over the next few decades. Only 44% of the ski resorts wouldthen still be snow-reliable. While some regions may be able to maintain their winter tourism with suitable adaptation strategies, others would lose winter tourism due to a diminishing snow pack. Climate change must be viewed as a catalyst that is reinforcing and accelerating the pace of structural changes in tourism. Today, adaptation strategies are predominant in tourism (e.g. artificial snow production). As an industry that will be severely affected by climate change, however, tourism will increasingly have to focus on mitigation strategies (e.g. less greenhouse gas emissions by tourism traffic).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:03 Jun 2008 08:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:23
Publisher:Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln
ISBN:978-00-023716-4
Additional Information:Appears in electronic form only
Related URLs:http://www.klimazwei.de/Ver%C3%B6ffentlichungen/tabid/127/Default.aspx (Publisher)
http://www.mif.uni-freiburg.de/matzarakis/papers/Book_Nato.pdf (Publisher)
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2539

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