UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Outcome after incomplete spinal cord injury: central cord versus Brown-Sequard syndrome


Wirz, M; Zörner, B; Rupp, R; Dietz, V (2010). Outcome after incomplete spinal cord injury: central cord versus Brown-Sequard syndrome. Spinal Cord, 48(5):407-414.

Abstract

Study design : A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data.Objective:A hemisection of the spinal cord is a frequently used animal model for spinal cord injury (SCI), the corresponding human condition, that is, the Brown-Sequard syndrome (BS), is relatively rare as compared with the central cord syndrome (CC). The time course of neurological deficit, functional recovery, impulse conductivity and rehabilitation length of stay in BS and CC subjects were compared.Setting:Nine European Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Centers.Methods:Motor score, walking function, daily life activities, somatosensory evoked potentials and length of stay were evaluated 1 and 6 months after SCI, and were compared between age-matched groups of tetraparetic BS and CC subjects.Results:For all analyzed measures no difference in the time course of improvement was found in 15 matched pairs.Conclusion:In contrast to the assumption of a better outcome of subjects with BS, no difference was found between the two incomplete SCI groups. This is of interest with respect to the different potential mechanisms leading to a recovery of functions in these two SCI subgroups.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 10 November 2009; doi:10.1038/sc.2009.149.

Study design : A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data.Objective:A hemisection of the spinal cord is a frequently used animal model for spinal cord injury (SCI), the corresponding human condition, that is, the Brown-Sequard syndrome (BS), is relatively rare as compared with the central cord syndrome (CC). The time course of neurological deficit, functional recovery, impulse conductivity and rehabilitation length of stay in BS and CC subjects were compared.Setting:Nine European Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Centers.Methods:Motor score, walking function, daily life activities, somatosensory evoked potentials and length of stay were evaluated 1 and 6 months after SCI, and were compared between age-matched groups of tetraparetic BS and CC subjects.Results:For all analyzed measures no difference in the time course of improvement was found in 15 matched pairs.Conclusion:In contrast to the assumption of a better outcome of subjects with BS, no difference was found between the two incomplete SCI groups. This is of interest with respect to the different potential mechanisms leading to a recovery of functions in these two SCI subgroups.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 10 November 2009; doi:10.1038/sc.2009.149.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:10 Dec 2009 09:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:37
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2009.149
PubMed ID:19901956

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations