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Essstörungen (II): Zahnmedizinische Aspekte


Imfeld, C; Imfeld, T (2005). Essstörungen (II): Zahnmedizinische Aspekte. Schweizer Monatsschrift für Zahnmedizin SMfZ, 115(12):1163-1171.

Abstract

Patients suffering from eating disorders exhibit oral symptoms indicative to the otherwise concealed illness. The most striking features are the intrinsic erosions due to the regular surreptitious vomiting. They occur in very typical locations within the dental arches and have been termed "perimolysis". Dental professionals are often the first to discover and diagnose eating disorders by detecting perimolysis and consequently face the difficult task to motivate the patients--who often deny their illness--to seek psychiatric help and dental care. Such motivation must be done while respecting the patients' integrity and sense of self-worth. The primary goal of dental care is to preserve the remaining teeth and to prevent further erosive loss of dental hard tissue. The key elements of a dental preventive programme based on pathophysiologic grounds are to enhance local defence mechanisms, to offer chemical and mechanical protection and to diminish abrasive and erosive challenges. Dental restorative therapy must be part of a combined medical and dental treatment plan and should not be started before the eating disorder has been treated and the patients are considered to have stable prognosis. In view of the young age of the patients, the large extension of the erosive lesions and in order to avoid endodontological treatment of mostly sound pulps, non-invasive restorative concepts using adhesive technology should be preferably used. Prophylactic measures and restorative treatment are covered by health insurance (KGV; KLV 18c, 7) if the patients undergo psychiatric or similar adequate treatment.

Patients suffering from eating disorders exhibit oral symptoms indicative to the otherwise concealed illness. The most striking features are the intrinsic erosions due to the regular surreptitious vomiting. They occur in very typical locations within the dental arches and have been termed "perimolysis". Dental professionals are often the first to discover and diagnose eating disorders by detecting perimolysis and consequently face the difficult task to motivate the patients--who often deny their illness--to seek psychiatric help and dental care. Such motivation must be done while respecting the patients' integrity and sense of self-worth. The primary goal of dental care is to preserve the remaining teeth and to prevent further erosive loss of dental hard tissue. The key elements of a dental preventive programme based on pathophysiologic grounds are to enhance local defence mechanisms, to offer chemical and mechanical protection and to diminish abrasive and erosive challenges. Dental restorative therapy must be part of a combined medical and dental treatment plan and should not be started before the eating disorder has been treated and the patients are considered to have stable prognosis. In view of the young age of the patients, the large extension of the erosive lesions and in order to avoid endodontological treatment of mostly sound pulps, non-invasive restorative concepts using adhesive technology should be preferably used. Prophylactic measures and restorative treatment are covered by health insurance (KGV; KLV 18c, 7) if the patients undergo psychiatric or similar adequate treatment.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Eating disorders (II): dental aspects
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:December 2005
Deposited On:10 Jun 2008 07:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:23
Publisher:Schweizerische Zahnärzte-Gesellschft
ISSN:0256-2855
Additional Information:Free full text article
Official URL:http://www.sso.ch/doc/doc_download.cfm?uuid=9553812CD9D9424C4CAD4CA30F629D28&&IRACER_AUTOLINK&&
PubMed ID:16408821
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2550

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