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Arzneimittelinteraktionen mit antiretroviralen Medikamenten


Ceschi, A; Curkovic, I; Kirchheiner, J; Kullak-Ublick, G; Jetter, A (2010). Arzneimittelinteraktionen mit antiretroviralen Medikamenten. Der Internist, 51(1):94-99.

Abstract

Drug-drug interactions are frequently encountered in the therapy of HIV-infected patients, since the highly active antiretroviral therapy always contains several drugs. Drugs against opportunistic infections and concomitant diseases are added frequently. All protease inhibitors are inhibitors of CYP3A, which is important in the metabolism of approximately 50% of all drugs, e.g. simvastatin, atorvastatin, sildenafil, and clarithromycin. Among the protease inhibitors, ritonavir is the strongest inhibitor of CYP3A activity. This inhibition is also used to enhance ("boost") the bioavailability of other protease inhibitors. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) efavirenz and nevirapine lead to an increase in CYP3A activity during long-term treatment. To prevent interactions, doses of CYP3A substrates have to be adapted in the beginning and at the end of CYP3A activity-modifying treatments. Interactions can also be a result of modifications in the activities of glucuronosyltransferases and of transport proteins. Ritonavir is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, which leads to increased expositions towards many antineoplastic drugs.

Drug-drug interactions are frequently encountered in the therapy of HIV-infected patients, since the highly active antiretroviral therapy always contains several drugs. Drugs against opportunistic infections and concomitant diseases are added frequently. All protease inhibitors are inhibitors of CYP3A, which is important in the metabolism of approximately 50% of all drugs, e.g. simvastatin, atorvastatin, sildenafil, and clarithromycin. Among the protease inhibitors, ritonavir is the strongest inhibitor of CYP3A activity. This inhibition is also used to enhance ("boost") the bioavailability of other protease inhibitors. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) efavirenz and nevirapine lead to an increase in CYP3A activity during long-term treatment. To prevent interactions, doses of CYP3A substrates have to be adapted in the beginning and at the end of CYP3A activity-modifying treatments. Interactions can also be a result of modifications in the activities of glucuronosyltransferases and of transport proteins. Ritonavir is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, which leads to increased expositions towards many antineoplastic drugs.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Interactions with antiretroviral drugs
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:January 2010
Deposited On:14 Dec 2009 15:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:37
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0020-9554
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00108-009-2528-2
PubMed ID:19943026
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-25548

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