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ICSE 2009 Tutorial - Semantic Web Technologies in Software Engineering


Gall, H C; Reif, G (2009). ICSE 2009 Tutorial - Semantic Web Technologies in Software Engineering. In: 31th International Conference on Software Engineering, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 16 May 2009 - 24 May 2009, 1-2.

Abstract

Over the years, the software engineering community has developed various tools to support the specification, development, and maintainance of software. Many of these tools use proprietary data formats to store artifacts which hamper interoperability. On the other hand, the Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries. Ontologies are used to define the concepts in the domain of discourse and their relationships and as such provide the formal vocabulary applications use to exchange data. Besides the Web, the technologies developed for the Semantic Web have proven to be useful also in other domains, especially when data is exchanged between applications from different parties. Software engineering is one of these domains in which recent research shows that Semantic Web technologies are able to reduce the barriers of proprietary data formats and enable interoperability.

In this tutorial, we present Semantic Web technologies and their application in software engineering. We discuss the current status of ontologies for software entities, bug reports, or change requests, as well as semantic representations for software and its documentation. This way, architecture, design, code, or test models can be shared across application boundaries enabling a seamless integration of engineering results.

Over the years, the software engineering community has developed various tools to support the specification, development, and maintainance of software. Many of these tools use proprietary data formats to store artifacts which hamper interoperability. On the other hand, the Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries. Ontologies are used to define the concepts in the domain of discourse and their relationships and as such provide the formal vocabulary applications use to exchange data. Besides the Web, the technologies developed for the Semantic Web have proven to be useful also in other domains, especially when data is exchanged between applications from different parties. Software engineering is one of these domains in which recent research shows that Semantic Web technologies are able to reduce the barriers of proprietary data formats and enable interoperability.

In this tutorial, we present Semantic Web technologies and their application in software engineering. We discuss the current status of ontologies for software entities, bug reports, or change requests, as well as semantic representations for software and its documentation. This way, architecture, design, code, or test models can be shared across application boundaries enabling a seamless integration of engineering results.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Other), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:24 May 2009
Deposited On:07 Jan 2010 11:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:38
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-25781

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