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Bedeutung der emotionalen Valenz beim emotionalen Gedächtniseffekt bei Demenzpatienten


Blessing, A; Fritsche-Fäh, L; Schaenzle-Geiger, H; Jäncke, Lutz (2009). Bedeutung der emotionalen Valenz beim emotionalen Gedächtniseffekt bei Demenzpatienten. Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie, 20(2):141-151.

Abstract

Highly emotional events are usually remembered better than neutral events. The enhancement of explicit memory for emotional stimuli compared to neutral stimuli is called emotional memory effect. Many studies suggest that under certain conditions the emotional memory effect can be shown in dementia patients. The current study investigated if an enhancement of explicit memory can be found for information that is emotionally positive or negative or both in dementia patients. Dementia patients and a control group viewed emotionally arousing (pleasant and aversive) and neutral photographs and were presented stories containing pleasant, aversive and neutral elements. Immediate and delayed free recall were tested. Patients remembered more aversive pictures than pleasant pictures, whereas controls remembered emotionally arousing pictures with different valence equally well. This effect could not be explained by mood congruency, depressed and nondepressed patients showed the same pattern of memory performance. All participants tented to remember more aversive story elements than pleasant story elements, no group differences appeared. The result suggests that aversive information is better retained than pleasant information by dementia patients. The finding is important for nonpharmacological therapy of dementia patients.

Abstract

Highly emotional events are usually remembered better than neutral events. The enhancement of explicit memory for emotional stimuli compared to neutral stimuli is called emotional memory effect. Many studies suggest that under certain conditions the emotional memory effect can be shown in dementia patients. The current study investigated if an enhancement of explicit memory can be found for information that is emotionally positive or negative or both in dementia patients. Dementia patients and a control group viewed emotionally arousing (pleasant and aversive) and neutral photographs and were presented stories containing pleasant, aversive and neutral elements. Immediate and delayed free recall were tested. Patients remembered more aversive pictures than pleasant pictures, whereas controls remembered emotionally arousing pictures with different valence equally well. This effect could not be explained by mood congruency, depressed and nondepressed patients showed the same pattern of memory performance. All participants tented to remember more aversive story elements than pleasant story elements, no group differences appeared. The result suggests that aversive information is better retained than pleasant information by dementia patients. The finding is important for nonpharmacological therapy of dementia patients.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Valence of verbal and nonverbal stimuli and the emotional memory effect in dementia patients
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:German
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Dec 2009 13:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:38
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1016-264X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1016-264X.20.2.141

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