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Characterization of patients discharged from inpatient treatment for burnout: use of psychological characteristics to identify aftercare needs


Haberthür, A; Elkuch, F; Grosse Holtforth, Martin; Hochstrasser, B; Soyka, M (2009). Characterization of patients discharged from inpatient treatment for burnout: use of psychological characteristics to identify aftercare needs. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65(10):1039-1055.

Abstract

With increasing severity, burnout corresponds to a state of significant suffering with impaired social functioning, decreased quality of life, and psychosomatic complaints. The present study investigates (a) how former patients of an inpatient clinic for burnout therapy can be grouped on the basis of their psychological characteristics and (b) whether these groups correspond to different levels of residual symptoms (depression and burnout) and general mental health. Cluster analysis of psychological characteristics was used to form groups. Four specific groups could be identified (functionals, dysfunctionals, straightforward pragmatists, unhappy altruists). This grouping, with subsequent characterization according to symptom levels, provides important information indicating possible needs for aftercare and suggests areas for improvement of previous care.

With increasing severity, burnout corresponds to a state of significant suffering with impaired social functioning, decreased quality of life, and psychosomatic complaints. The present study investigates (a) how former patients of an inpatient clinic for burnout therapy can be grouped on the basis of their psychological characteristics and (b) whether these groups correspond to different levels of residual symptoms (depression and burnout) and general mental health. Cluster analysis of psychological characteristics was used to form groups. Four specific groups could be identified (functionals, dysfunctionals, straightforward pragmatists, unhappy altruists). This grouping, with subsequent characterization according to symptom levels, provides important information indicating possible needs for aftercare and suggests areas for improvement of previous care.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:27 August 2009
Deposited On:13 Jan 2010 15:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0021-9762
Publisher DOI:10.1002/jclp.20606
PubMed ID:19714725
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-26232

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