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Borrelia in granuloma annulare, morphea and lichen sclerosus: a PCR-based study and review of the literature


Zollinger, T; Mertz, K D; Schmid, M; Schmitt, A; Pfaltz, M; Kempf, W (2010). Borrelia in granuloma annulare, morphea and lichen sclerosus: a PCR-based study and review of the literature. Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, 37(5):571-577.

Abstract

Background: Morphea, granuloma annulare (GA) and lichen sclerosus et atrophicans (LSA) have also been suggested to be linked to Borrelia infection. Previous studies based on serologic data or detection of Borrelia by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported contradictory results. Thus, we examined skin biopsies of morphea, GA and LSA by PCR to assess the prevalence of Borrelia DNA in an endemic area and to compare our results with data in the literature. Methods: Amplification of DNA sequences of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato by nested PCR from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded skin biopsies of morphea, GA and LSA, followed by automated sequencing of amplification products. PCR-based studies on Borrelia species in these disorders published until July 2009 were retrieved by a literature search. Results: Borrelia DNA was detected in 3 of 112 skin biopsies (2.7%) including one of 49 morphea biopsies (2.0%), one of 48 GA biopsies (2.1%) and one of 15 LSA biopsies (6.6%). Amplification products belonged to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in two cases available for sequence analysis. Conclusions: The results of our and most of other PCR-based studies do not argue for a significant association of B. burgdorferi sensu lato with morphea, GA, LSA. Zollinger T, Mertz KD, Schmid M, Schmitt A, Pfaltz M, Kempf W. Borrelia in granuloma annulare, morphea and lichen sclerosus: a PCR-based study and review of the literature.

Background: Morphea, granuloma annulare (GA) and lichen sclerosus et atrophicans (LSA) have also been suggested to be linked to Borrelia infection. Previous studies based on serologic data or detection of Borrelia by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reported contradictory results. Thus, we examined skin biopsies of morphea, GA and LSA by PCR to assess the prevalence of Borrelia DNA in an endemic area and to compare our results with data in the literature. Methods: Amplification of DNA sequences of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato by nested PCR from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded skin biopsies of morphea, GA and LSA, followed by automated sequencing of amplification products. PCR-based studies on Borrelia species in these disorders published until July 2009 were retrieved by a literature search. Results: Borrelia DNA was detected in 3 of 112 skin biopsies (2.7%) including one of 49 morphea biopsies (2.0%), one of 48 GA biopsies (2.1%) and one of 15 LSA biopsies (6.6%). Amplification products belonged to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in two cases available for sequence analysis. Conclusions: The results of our and most of other PCR-based studies do not argue for a significant association of B. burgdorferi sensu lato with morphea, GA, LSA. Zollinger T, Mertz KD, Schmid M, Schmitt A, Pfaltz M, Kempf W. Borrelia in granuloma annulare, morphea and lichen sclerosus: a PCR-based study and review of the literature.

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23 citations in Web of Science®
31 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:22 Dec 2009 08:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0303-6987
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0560.2009.01493.x
PubMed ID:20015188

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