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Ferric carboxymaltose in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency


Anker, S D; Comin Colet, J; Filippatos, G; Willenheimer, R; Dickstein, K; Drexler, H; Lüscher, T F; Bart, B; Banasiak, W; Niegowska, J; Kirwan, B A; Mori, C; von Eisenhart Rothe, B; Pocock, S J; Poole-Wilson, P A; Ponikowski, P (2009). Ferric carboxymaltose in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency. New England Journal of Medicine, 361(25):2436-2448.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency may impair aerobic performance. This study aimed to determine whether treatment with intravenous iron (ferric carboxymaltose) would improve symptoms in patients who had heart failure, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, and iron deficiency, either with or without anemia. METHODS: We enrolled 459 patients with chronic heart failure of New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II or III, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40% or less (for patients with NYHA class II) or 45% or less (for NYHA class III), iron deficiency (ferritin level <100 microg per liter or between 100 and 299 microg per liter, if the transferrin saturation was <20%), and a hemoglobin level of 95 to 135 g per liter. Patients were randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive 200 mg of intravenous iron (ferric carboxymaltose) or saline (placebo). The primary end points were the self-reported Patient Global Assessment and NYHA functional class, both at week 24. Secondary end points included the distance walked in 6 minutes and the health-related quality of life. RESULTS: Among the patients receiving ferric carboxymaltose, 50% reported being much or moderately improved, as compared with 28% of patients receiving placebo, according to the Patient Global Assessment (odds ratio for improvement, 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 3.61). Among the patients assigned to ferric carboxymaltose, 47% had an NYHA functional class I or II at week 24, as compared with 30% of patients assigned to placebo (odds ratio for improvement by one class, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.55 to 3.71). Results were similar in patients with anemia and those without anemia. Significant improvements were seen with ferric carboxymaltose in the distance on the 6-minute walk test and quality-of-life assessments. The rates of death, adverse events, and serious adverse events were similar in the two study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency, with or without anemia, improves symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life; the side-effect profile is acceptable. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00520780).

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency may impair aerobic performance. This study aimed to determine whether treatment with intravenous iron (ferric carboxymaltose) would improve symptoms in patients who had heart failure, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, and iron deficiency, either with or without anemia. METHODS: We enrolled 459 patients with chronic heart failure of New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II or III, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40% or less (for patients with NYHA class II) or 45% or less (for NYHA class III), iron deficiency (ferritin level <100 microg per liter or between 100 and 299 microg per liter, if the transferrin saturation was <20%), and a hemoglobin level of 95 to 135 g per liter. Patients were randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive 200 mg of intravenous iron (ferric carboxymaltose) or saline (placebo). The primary end points were the self-reported Patient Global Assessment and NYHA functional class, both at week 24. Secondary end points included the distance walked in 6 minutes and the health-related quality of life. RESULTS: Among the patients receiving ferric carboxymaltose, 50% reported being much or moderately improved, as compared with 28% of patients receiving placebo, according to the Patient Global Assessment (odds ratio for improvement, 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 3.61). Among the patients assigned to ferric carboxymaltose, 47% had an NYHA functional class I or II at week 24, as compared with 30% of patients assigned to placebo (odds ratio for improvement by one class, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.55 to 3.71). Results were similar in patients with anemia and those without anemia. Significant improvements were seen with ferric carboxymaltose in the distance on the 6-minute walk test and quality-of-life assessments. The rates of death, adverse events, and serious adverse events were similar in the two study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency, with or without anemia, improves symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life; the side-effect profile is acceptable. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00520780).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nephrology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:04 Jan 2010 09:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:42
Publisher:Massachusetts Medical Society
ISSN:0028-4793
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0908355
PubMed ID:19920054

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