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Sklerodermie


Distler, O; Gay, S (2010). Sklerodermie. Der Internist, 51(1):30-38.

Abstract

Scleroderma (synonyms: systemic sclerosis, systemic scleroderma) is a systemic disease which affects the skin as well as internal organs such as the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, and the heart. Pathogenetically a distinction should be made between uncontrolled formation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibrosis) and vasculopathy. In addition to organ fibrosis, this leads to a clinical picture of vascular manifestations. These include fingertip ulcers, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and acute renal crisis. Localized forms of scleroderma, such as morphea, which do not involve organ complications, should be differentiated from systemic sclerosis. Due to its clinical heterogeneity and high rate of morbidity and mortality, systemic sclerosis poses an enormous diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in everyday clinical practice. This review article summarizes the current status of classification and epidemiology, pathogenesis, and the most important clinical manifestations such as interstitial fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, acute renal crisis, and peripheral vasculopathy and provides an overview of current and future treatment options.

Scleroderma (synonyms: systemic sclerosis, systemic scleroderma) is a systemic disease which affects the skin as well as internal organs such as the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, and the heart. Pathogenetically a distinction should be made between uncontrolled formation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibrosis) and vasculopathy. In addition to organ fibrosis, this leads to a clinical picture of vascular manifestations. These include fingertip ulcers, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and acute renal crisis. Localized forms of scleroderma, such as morphea, which do not involve organ complications, should be differentiated from systemic sclerosis. Due to its clinical heterogeneity and high rate of morbidity and mortality, systemic sclerosis poses an enormous diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in everyday clinical practice. This review article summarizes the current status of classification and epidemiology, pathogenesis, and the most important clinical manifestations such as interstitial fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, acute renal crisis, and peripheral vasculopathy and provides an overview of current and future treatment options.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Other titles:Scleroderma
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2010
Deposited On:08 Jan 2010 13:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:43
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0020-9554
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00108-009-2405-z
PubMed ID:20033389
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-26804

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