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Pollination efficiency and the evolution of specialized deceptive pollination systems


Scopece, G; Cozzolino, S; Johnson, S D; Schiestl, F P (2010). Pollination efficiency and the evolution of specialized deceptive pollination systems. American Naturalist, 175(1):98-105.

Abstract

The ultimate causes of evolution of highly specialized pollination systems are little understood. We investigated the relationship between specialization and pollination efficiency, defined as the proportion of pollinated flowers relative to those that experienced pollen removal, using orchids with different pollination strategies as a model system. Rewarding orchids showed the highest pollination efficiency. Sexually deceptive orchids had comparably high pollination efficiency, but food-deceptive orchids had significantly lower efficiency. Values for pollinator sharing (a measure of the degree of generalization in pollination systems) showed the reverse pattern, in that groups with high pollination efficiency had low values of pollinator sharing. Low pollinator sharing may thus be the basis for efficient pollination. Population genetic data indicated that both food- and sexually deceptive species have higher degrees of among-population gene flow than do rewarding orchids. Thus, the shift from food to sexual deception may be driven by selection for more efficient pollination, without compromising the high levels of gene flow that are characteristic of deceptive species.

Abstract

The ultimate causes of evolution of highly specialized pollination systems are little understood. We investigated the relationship between specialization and pollination efficiency, defined as the proportion of pollinated flowers relative to those that experienced pollen removal, using orchids with different pollination strategies as a model system. Rewarding orchids showed the highest pollination efficiency. Sexually deceptive orchids had comparably high pollination efficiency, but food-deceptive orchids had significantly lower efficiency. Values for pollinator sharing (a measure of the degree of generalization in pollination systems) showed the reverse pattern, in that groups with high pollination efficiency had low values of pollinator sharing. Low pollinator sharing may thus be the basis for efficient pollination. Population genetic data indicated that both food- and sexually deceptive species have higher degrees of among-population gene flow than do rewarding orchids. Thus, the shift from food to sexual deception may be driven by selection for more efficient pollination, without compromising the high levels of gene flow that are characteristic of deceptive species.

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31 citations in Web of Science®
36 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Systematic Botany and Botanical Gardens
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:24 Jan 2010 11:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:43
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0003-0147
Additional Information:© 2010 by The American Naturalist © 2009 by The University of Chicago
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/648555
PubMed ID:19909087

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