UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Learning to appreciate others: Neural development of cognitive perspective taking


Dosch, M; Loenneker, T; Bucher, K; Martin, E; Klaver, P (2010). Learning to appreciate others: Neural development of cognitive perspective taking. NeuroImage, 50(2):837-846.

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies have thoroughly investigated brain regions that are recruited when we put ourselves in another person's shoes. Taking a third-person perspective (3PP) as opposed to a first-person perspective (1PP) has been associated with brain activation in the inferior parietal cortex, the medial posterior cortex and the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigate for the first time the development of the neural network that yields cognitive perspective taking. Twelve adults (aged 25-32 years) and twelve school-aged children (aged 8-10 years) were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Behaviorally, we found a decrease of reaction time differences between 3PP and 1PP with age indicating that adults were more efficient in processing a 3PP. Despite the reaction time differences both groups were equally accurate in their judgments. Brain imaging data indicated neural activity in the left inferior parietal cortex and precuneus for adults during 3PP as compared with 1PP judgments. Children additionally showed enhanced activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right inferior perietal cortex. We found a significant interaction between groups and brain activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and in the right inferior parietal cortex. These results suggest that the development of the ability to reason about another person's mind accompanies a shift in activity from frontal to posterior brain regions and from bilateral to unilateral left inferior parietal cortex.

Neuroimaging studies have thoroughly investigated brain regions that are recruited when we put ourselves in another person's shoes. Taking a third-person perspective (3PP) as opposed to a first-person perspective (1PP) has been associated with brain activation in the inferior parietal cortex, the medial posterior cortex and the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigate for the first time the development of the neural network that yields cognitive perspective taking. Twelve adults (aged 25-32 years) and twelve school-aged children (aged 8-10 years) were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Behaviorally, we found a decrease of reaction time differences between 3PP and 1PP with age indicating that adults were more efficient in processing a 3PP. Despite the reaction time differences both groups were equally accurate in their judgments. Brain imaging data indicated neural activity in the left inferior parietal cortex and precuneus for adults during 3PP as compared with 1PP judgments. Children additionally showed enhanced activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right inferior perietal cortex. We found a significant interaction between groups and brain activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and in the right inferior parietal cortex. These results suggest that the development of the ability to reason about another person's mind accompanies a shift in activity from frontal to posterior brain regions and from bilateral to unilateral left inferior parietal cortex.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

110 downloads since deposited on 20 Dec 2010
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:20 Dec 2010 15:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:43
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.12.013
PubMed ID:20025981
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-26882

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 347kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations