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Effects of a short behavioural intervention for dental flossing: randomized-controlled trial on planning when, where and how


Schüz, B; Wiedemann, U A; Mallach, N; Scholz, Urte (2009). Effects of a short behavioural intervention for dental flossing: randomized-controlled trial on planning when, where and how. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 36:498-505.

Abstract

AIM: Regular dental flossing has been widely recommended to prevent periodontal diseases. Nevertheless, compliance is below a desirable level. This study evaluates the effects of a brief behavioural intervention on dental flossing and determines whether the effects of such an intervention are stronger in a specific subgroup of individuals (those intending to floss regularly=implemental mindset).

MATERIALS AND METHOD: Behavioural intervention (planning when, where and how to floss) trial was conducting with 194 participants assigned to an intervention or a control group by a random time schedule; the primary outcome was validated self-report of flossing behaviour. Follow-up data were collected 2 and 8 weeks post-intervention.

RESULTS: Individuals receiving the planning intervention significantly outperformed those in the control condition at both the 2- and the 8-week follow-up (4.24 times flossing/week versus 3.9 at 2 weeks; 4.02 versus 2.98 at 8 weeks). Intervention effects were stronger in individuals in the implemental mindset. Dropout rates were higher for participants who received the planning intervention but were not in the implemental mindset.

CONCLUSION: Planning interventions are an economic and effective way to change oral self-care behaviour, and are more effective in individuals in an implemental mindset.

AIM: Regular dental flossing has been widely recommended to prevent periodontal diseases. Nevertheless, compliance is below a desirable level. This study evaluates the effects of a brief behavioural intervention on dental flossing and determines whether the effects of such an intervention are stronger in a specific subgroup of individuals (those intending to floss regularly=implemental mindset).

MATERIALS AND METHOD: Behavioural intervention (planning when, where and how to floss) trial was conducting with 194 participants assigned to an intervention or a control group by a random time schedule; the primary outcome was validated self-report of flossing behaviour. Follow-up data were collected 2 and 8 weeks post-intervention.

RESULTS: Individuals receiving the planning intervention significantly outperformed those in the control condition at both the 2- and the 8-week follow-up (4.24 times flossing/week versus 3.9 at 2 weeks; 4.02 versus 2.98 at 8 weeks). Intervention effects were stronger in individuals in the implemental mindset. Dropout rates were higher for participants who received the planning intervention but were not in the implemental mindset.

CONCLUSION: Planning interventions are an economic and effective way to change oral self-care behaviour, and are more effective in individuals in an implemental mindset.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:03 Feb 2010 15:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:43
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0303-6979
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01406.x
PubMed ID:19453572

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